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Welcome to College news. News is displayed in date order as received with most recent at the top.  You can SEARCH for a specific article using the search box above.

You can FILTER the news to view those article applicable to your child/ren’s school (Junior, Middle or Senior) or those that are of specific interest to you.

Note: You can select more than one filter option at a time eg Junior and Senior.

Principal’s Message Term 2 Week 8

Learning How to Learn

The difference in the futures of our young people compared to those of 50 or even 30 years ago, is that change is occurring not just at a rapid rate but rapidly accelerating. As the future for today’s students unfolds, it will appear far different from that which we are experiencing today. So we are preparing our students for a somewhat murky future, one that lacks the clarity of past generations. What is clear though is that learning how to learn will be vitally important, more so than ever before.

In the 90’s the trend in education was of Learning Styles – Visual, Audio and Kinaesthetic. The idea was that we all had a particular learning style and, taken further, that teachers were supposed to teach every lesson to every different learning style in the classroom. What the theory behind this concept actually said was, we all have a preferred learning style, be aware of it; it is a strength, but make sure that you practice other ways of learning so you have the ability to learn in a variety of ways. Then, when presented with a problem or concept, students have a number of different strategies to tackle it in order to find a solution.

Recent, however, research has found no scientific evidence to support this concept.

Regardless of whether we agree with the concept of learning styles or not, what I hope we all agree on is that we want our young people to have a range of ways and strategies to help them with their learning. In educating our students for their future we must all be nurturing their ability in ‘Learning How to Learn’. If a student struggles to spell a word, solve a problem or understand a concept, they need to be able to employ other ways to do so. Finding information has never been easier, but the ability of a person to move their learning forward, to be a valuable team member and contribute to the learning dynamic in each educational setting all feeds into a person’s confidence, courage, tenacity, sense of responsibility and self-awareness.

This vision of someone who can adapt their learning to the current situation brings to my mind people such as Michaelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, who were painters, sculptors, engineers, architects, creators and inventors – whatever was required by the circumstances at the time. We must make sure that our students don’t put themselves, or allow themselves to be put, in a box and categorised by the notion of a predisposed, inflexible thinking style.

Andy Müller
Principal

 

Term 3 & 4 Early Learning enrolment

The new Term 3 Early Learning class commences on Wednesday 24 July. This is an opportunity for children who have recently turned three to have a gentle transition into school in this two day per week class (Wednesday and Friday) for Term 3 and 4.

There are still some places available in this class. Families interested in enrolment starting in July or during Term 3 (current College families with younger siblings or families new to the College) should contact Nardia Deverell on (03) 6336 3407 or nardia.deverell@soc.tas.edu.au or Junior School reception for further details.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

End of Term

All Junior School classes close for the winter break at 3.00pm on Friday 28 June. After School Care closes at 6.00pm on this day.

The Elphin Campus reception closes at 4.30pm on 28 June and reopens at 8.00am on Monday 22 July. The school can be contacted via the Penquite reception which is open during normal office hours throughout the holiday period.

The Vacation Care program commences on Monday 1 July and runs from 8.00am – 5.30pm Monday to Friday for the full three week break and on Monday 22 July. Download the program and booking form here.

All classes resume for Term 3 on Tuesday 23 July.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Learning in the dark

Thank you to all the Early Learning Elphin students and families who were able to contribute to such an exciting evening session inside and outside the classrooms on Thursday evening. On a perfect evening – dark early (no moon), crisp winter air, clear skies – the students were able make their own lanterns to help explore and experience their school as it is during the night, to search for nocturnal creatures, and to view Jupiter and the stars in the night sky through a very powerful telescope.

Tonight, Prep students and families are hoping for clear skies again for their winter solstice stargazing session with the Northern Valleys Astronomy Club members and their telescopes.

Thank you to all staff involved in planning these experiences, and particularly to our resident astronomer Mrs Katrina Edmunds.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Mid Winter Party is coming!

 

The invitations have gone out and bookings have started.  We are excited to invite the entire College community, past and present to our Mid Winter Party. This is a great opportunity for parents of all year levels to catch up and make new friends.

Being held at Volvo Cars Launceston, we invite you to dress in your favourite smart & casual outfit but include a “touch of tartan” if you can!

A stand-up event, there will be beverages on arrival and substantial canapes throughout the evening. There will be a cashless bar for extra drinks so bring your card.

To all the new families who have recently joined the Scotch Oakburn College community, and for those who may not be aware, babysitters (who are staff at the College) are available so you can join the party! For more information about how to utilise this babysitting option please contact Nardia Deverell on 6336 3407 or Nardia.Deverell@soc.tas.edu.au.

Grab your tartan, book your tickets and we look forward to seeing you!

 

Book Now

Senior School Round Square

As Artificial Intelligence (AI) becomes more embedded in our everyday life it is good to give some thought to the benefits and costs associated with this. At the recent Senior School Round Square meeting Year 11 student Greta Brown ran a thought-provoking examination of the AI industry, looking at who is driving the growth of AI and discussing some of the ethical questions surrounding the industry. She notes that many of the developers of AI are American or Chinese males, and this can create biases in AI programs that may subtly disadvantage minority groups or women. The relationships between private AI companies and governments around the world was also explored, with discussion being had on the implications for the privacy and safety of individual citizens as AI becomes more prolific.

Mark Hassell
Dean of Students

/ Round Square, Senior School

Taking opportunities

Having the courage to accept responsibility is a cornerstone for all learners of all ages!  This week as I reconnect with Senior School students and their learning community, I have been “walking the talk” in regards to taking opportunities!

For all of us, as life-long learners, an aspiration is to be courageous and to accept responsibility.  Without courage, we won’t know what learnings will emerge from the experience, or what we will benefit from it.  Carol Dweck (researcher on Growth Mindsets) highlights that this ‘courage’ or growth mindset provides greater connection to learning and experiences, leading to the development of a ‘benefit mindset’.  The belief and actions embedded in this are to reward the learner to give to others first.

For our TCE students, I encourage you all to continue to take responsibility, accept the challenges and grab the feedback and learning from your Mid-Year Exams.  This attitude (growth mindset) will enable you to grow as a learner during Semester Two.

For Year 10 students, the opportunities to collaborate with your STEAM Projects has provided learning challenges.  From concept and design-based thinking to clarifying a concept ‘pitch’ to a business case.  Forecasting future learning environments, these skills will certainly be in all aspects of learning and work life.

For Year 9 students, being the best you can be every day is highlighted through your understanding of a key value, ‘Integrity”. Being aware and supportive of others is a significant part of this. During Semester Two several opportunities to develop this value will be provided both on campus and beyond.  I encourage you to have the courage to take the opportunities!

Ben Green
Acting Deputy Principal/Head of Senior School

/ Senior School

Professor Rob McWilliams visits the College

This week the College has hosted Professor Rob McWilliams as an artist and clinician in residence.  Professor McWilliams, or Doctor Rob, as the students called him worked with musicians across the Junior, Middle and Senior Schools providing wonderful learning experiences for students and Music staff.

He was Professor of Music and Director of Bands and Instrumental Music Education at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh from 1996 where he also served as Head of Music from 2011 to 2014.  He has taught, conducted and presented at major music conferences in Japan, Hong Kong, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Europe, China, all states of Australia.  In early 2015 he relocated to Brisbane, Australia where he is currently working for Yamaha Music Australia as their Education Outreach Clinician.  It is through his work with Yamaha Music Australia that enabled him to work the College’s musicians.

Dr Rob shared his wealth of knowledge and skills with our band and orchestra students, and I know that they learnt a great deal from Dr Rob and are inspired to continue their music making.

Stephen King
Head of Visual and Performing Arts

Rowing Coaches (Junior and Senior)

Scotch Oakburn rowing is a well-established and committed sport within our College, offering students the opportunity to be part of a long-held tradition of competitive rowing.

The College is seeking expressions of interest for Rowing Coaches who would welcome the opportunity to be part of our rowing program, Under 13 to Open squads for both boys and girls. Coaches are paid an honorarium depending on the age group.

For further information and copy of the Position Description and Selection Criteria, please direct enquiries to the Director of Rowing, Jamie Breden on 0438 038 773 or via email Jamie.Breden@soc.tas.edu.au.

Expressions of interest close Friday 19 July 2019.

 

Winter sport in full swing

This Saturday 22 June will see our Girls and Boys AFL first teams play in their respective finals.

The girls will play against Marist College in Burnie starting at 11.00am for the NSATIS Shield. If successful, the team will then play against The Fahan school from Hobart for the SATIS State Final. Our boys are playing St Patricks College at St Patricks in the SATIS Semi Final starting at 11.00am. Well done to both teams in making these finals and to the work of Persons-in-Charge Fiona Taylor and Bo Power, and coaches Paul McKendrick (girls) and Andrew McLean (boys) for their efforts in mentoring the students.

The College cross country team will be competing in the All Schools Cross Country Carnival being held on Tuesday 2 July at Symmons Plains. We have 48 competitors which is wonderful considering it is the first week of Scotch Oakburn school holidays. Teachers Julie Kemp and Andrew Robinson will be looking after the team.

Our College badminton team will also finish first in the NSATIS competition and finals will be played early in Term 3. Congratulations to Person–in–Charge of Badminton Angela Vaughan and her team on their efforts.

Netball, soccer and hockey have been up and running during Term 2 and will continue into Term 3 with NSATIS competitions. With hockey particularly, matches go ahead through rain, hail or sunshine, therefore players, coaches and Persons-in–Charge Fabrice Dauchez and Jane Gregg are thanked. Netball coaches on frosty Saturday mornings and soccer coaches on cold afternoon training and games are also thanked.

Fitness students have also been working hard under the watchful eyes of Lorna Wilson and John Poynter. The fitness centre has been packed to the rafters with students embarking on their fitness program.

The Scotch Oakburn athletics squad has been announced and training is underway leading up to the NSATIS and SATIS carnivals held during September. Person-in-Charge of Athletics, Andrew Robinson, and Paul McKendrick are supervising the squad and the team will be well prepared for the carnivals.

Congratulations to all students participating in their chosen sports and to staff and coaches for their efforts during the winter months. It is a team effort.

Rob Jeffery
Sports Administrator

 

/ Middle School, Senior School

Launceston Competitions

Our music students have been very successful at this year’s Launceston Competitions with many individuals and ensembles achieving outstanding results.  Many of the results have been published in recent weeks.  Another of our successful students was Layla Dyson-Oliver (Year 6) who received a Highly Commended Award in the Modern Vocal section.

Kael (Year 12) and Violet Haysom (Year 6) have also enjoyed success.

Kael received the following places, 1st Woodwind solo 18 years and under on clarinet, 1st Woodwind solo open age on bagpipes and 2nd Woodwind Teacher/Student duo 18 years and under on bagpipes.  Violet achieved 2nd Woodwind solo (primary) on clarinet and a Highly commended in her vocal solo.

Kael and Violet achieved 1st  place in Woodwind Duo 18 years and under with Kael on bagpipes and Violet on the tenor drum.

Stephen King
Head of Visual and Performing Arts

/ Middle School, Senior School

ANU National Indigenous Summer School program

The ANU National Indigenous Summer School runs every December between 7 and 14 December. This is a week-long camp where current students in Years 10 and 11 can experience what it is like to be a university student. They can elect to be placed in the Humanities and Social Sciences stream or the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine stream. All expenses are paid for by the ANU.

For more information visit the webpage –http://www.anu.edu.au/students/communities-events/national-indigenous-summer-school.

For more information download the flyer here – ANU-NISS Flyer-June-2019

 

/ Senior School

Collegian Sarah Cabrol-Douat to perform piano recital

Former Scotch Oakburn student Sarah Cabrol-Douat nee Gunton (’95) will be presenting a Piano Recital on Saturday 13 July at 3 pm in the beautiful Launceston City Baptist Church.  The recital will feature the music of Bach, Beethoven, Chopin and Medtner.

After having been spirited off to Moscow at age 15, Sarah has received a performance Degree from the Moscow Conservatorium, an Advanced Diploma from the École Normale in Paris and a Performance and Research Masters Degree from the Royal College in London.

She is now based in Paris where she works, plays and lives with her young French family.

Very consciously Tasmanian at heart, Sarah returns as often as she can to visit her Australian family and friends and to share her music with a community that will always be close to her heart!

If you are unable to attend on this date, you may like to hear play at the Kettering Hall in the south at 3 pm on Sunday, 7 July.

Stephen King
Head of Visual and Performing Arts

Year 8 Education Outdoors

This week 8X participated in their “Odyssey” experience in the Fingal Valley.  Despite some challenging weather on the first few days, the students enjoyed engaging in learning about what makes “good” women and men and connecting with local indigenous people.  The students also enjoyed a light bushwalk through the area.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

SOC2City

Last week our Year 7 students participated in SOC2City.

The students were based at UTAS School for Architecture for the week where they explored the City of Launceston, researched liveability factors, met with a number of key mentors and investigated and explored various problems such as access to services, life expectancy, carbon footprint, safety and health and wellbeing. The students then presented a “pitch” to a panel of judges who were looking for Australia’s most liveable regional city.

The students enjoyed learning in a different environment and having exposure to augmented reality technology through an App on their device called HP Reveal.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

East Coast Choir community program

Once again this year, our Year 5 and Year 6 students are invited to participate in the East Coast Choir community program.  This year we will be travelling to St Mary’s District School on Thursday, 1 August and schools from the East Coast will be travelling to Scotch Oakburn College on Friday, 16 August.  Justin Smith (Junior School teacher) has written a song, You and Me (working title), which we are hoping to record with harmonies, instrumentalists, countermelodies, and choreography. This is a very exciting opportunity and we would encourage all our Year 6 students to become involved.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

 

/ Middle School

What does integrity mean?

This week’s Connect@Elphin for Years 2-5 was led by Year 5 Hodgetts who focused our attention on integrity. Through personal examples and video clips of integrity in action, both at and beyond school, the Year 5’s skilfully highlighted the meaning and importance of integrity in our everyday actions and especially our interactions with others.

Integrity is one of the 24 key character strengths identified in the positive psychology work of Martin Seligman and others. For readers interested in learning more about character strengths a starting point could be https://positivepsychology.com/classification-character-strengths-virtues/.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Middle School Environmental Committee project

The Middle School Environmental committee have been busy collecting 2L milk cartons to build their greenhouse over the Middle School veggie garden.  While they have been doing a fabulous job, they still require additional milk cartons in order to be able to complete their project and design.  Milk cartons can be handed in at Middle School Reception at any time.

Thank you for your ongoing support.

(Please note the picture is an example of what could be constructed.  Construction has not yet started.)

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

NIJSSA Cross Country

On Wednesday, 19 June a number of Year 6 students participated in the NIJSSA Cross Country held at Windsor Park.  Our Year 6 students represented the school exceptionally well and demonstrated excellent sportsmanship throughout the day.  A special mention to Sophie Marshall who won the Year 6 girls event.  Congratulations to all students who competed.  We are very proud of your efforts.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

Mama Paulina School of Hope

The Middle School sponsor four children, Emmanuel, Scevia, Loriet and Carolyn, from the Mama Paulina School of Hope, a school for orphans and very poor children in a remote village in Kenya called Mukuro.

There are currently 120 students who attend the school; however, these numbers vary daily due to parents not being able to afford to pay the school fees, sickness and hardship.  Emmanuel, Scevia, Loriet and Carolyn have written letters to us, thanking us for our support.  These children are all learning to read and write and are very excited to receive letters from our students.  Please encourage your child to get involved by writing a letter.

We are looking forward to establishing a long term partnership with the school.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

 

/ Middle School

Student Achievements

Year 10 students Liam Canny and Zac Morris have been named in the Tasmania Devils NAB Rising Stars U16 Championships team.  Liam and Zac will travel to Sydney on 22 June to play the Northern Territory as part of the championships.

Kate Croft
Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School

/ Senior School

Artstart

Congratulations to the following Junior School students who have their work included in the QVMAG Artstart exhibition: Quaint, Quirky & Peculiar.

Year 1 painting: Gwyneth McLoughlin

Year 3 paintings: Lottie Cooke, Cassie Richman and Flynn McLoughlin

Year 4 relief prints: Cy Eberle, Scarlett Glover, Zoe O’Connor, Eva Cetti, Lily Murdoch, Charlie Palmer

This exhibition will be on show at QVMAG – Wellington St until November.

Suzanne Creese
Teacher

/ Junior School

Cross Country

Courage, determination, grit and teamwork were high on the list of character traits demonstrated in a fantastic team effort by all our runners at the NIJSSA Cross Country meeting at Windsor Park this week. Congratulations to all team members on their contribution to Scotch Oakburn’s overall 2nd place finish on the day, as well as to Nicky Reid and all staff who coached and supported the team.

Team placings were achieved by:

Year 3 Girls 3rd, Year 3 Boys 3rd, Year 4 Girls 1st, Year 5 Girls 3rd, Year 5 Boys 2nd, Year 6 Girls 2nd, Year 6 Boys 2nd.

Top 10 individual placings (in fields of 54 starters from 9 schools) were achieved by:

Year 3:
Girls – Anja Jacobs 5th, George Lowe 10th
Boys – Flynn McLoughlin 9th, Grady Frith 10th

Year 4
Girls  – Liv Dyson-Oliver 2nd, Isla Irani 3rd, Chloe Horsman 4th, Ailish Barron 5th
Boys – Ben Giasli 7th

Year 5
Girls – Bella Shaw 1st, Abigail Rigney 5th
Boys  –  Will Nichols 7th, Abhinav Sundaram 10th

Year 6
Girls  Sophie Marshall 1st, Mia Green 8th
Boys  Henry Jones 2nd

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

TCE Play

Congratulations to the TCE Drama and TCE Theatre Performance students who crafted an outstanding presentation of ‘Play-On’.

Thank you for the support from the College community for this presentation. Special thanks to the Director, Mrs Kathryn Gray and to the Technical Support Crew, Miss Katie Hill and student Jonty Darcy (Year 11).

Ben Green
Acting Deputy Principal/Head of Senior School

 

/ Senior School

Learning to be a Curator at QVMAG in Launceston

Isabella Wilson in Year 5 was recently selected as one of just five primary age students in the north of the state to participate as a guest curator of the Term 2 primary age Artstart exhibition at The Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallery in Launceston titled: Quaint, Quirky & Peculiar.

This innovative learning opportunity enabled Isabella to experience in an authentic setting, each stage of the process involved in curating and opening an art exhibition.  She demonstrated outstanding ability to work collaboratively with her peers, listening to reasoning and offering thoughtful and insightful justifications for her choices.  Isabella committed to assisting with a follow-up workshop where she helped with aesthetic decisions about selecting suitable colours of backing papers, making necessary adjustments to the final presentation of each artwork selected and deciding on the order of hanging based on how the works best related to each other.  Isabella also spoke at the opening of this exhibition.  Congratulations Isabella on your outstanding work!

Suzanne Creese
Teacher

 

/ Junior School

Student Achievement

Congratulations to Samantha Kirschbaum (Year 5) who has enjoyed an outstanding month in drama and music. In May she performed nine shows with the Launceston Players in their production of George Orwell’s 1984, playing the role of Parsons Girl.

In the recent Launceston Competitions vocal sections, she won first place in both the Selection from Stage or Film Musical, 12 years and under, and the Patricia Sargison Memorial Solo, 10 years and under.  She was also selected by the adjudicator to receive the Encouragement Award for Musical Theatre, 18 years and under, with a trophy and prize money donated by the Launceston Musical Society.

Lachie Wright
Head fo Junior School

/ Junior School

20 Things Parents Need to Quit

Author – Michael Grose 


 

Most parenting experts are committed to positive action to maintain forward momentum. Half of the parents I have met don’t need to learn what to do, they need to learn what to stop.

Parenting experts spend a lot of time helping parents learn what to do. But we don’t spend enough time teaching parents what to stop. There are a lot of good reasons for this. Probably most prominent is the fact that most parenting experts are committed to positive action to maintain forward momentum. If you are a parent or an educator who works with parents, then it’s helpful to focus on ‘What to Stop’ as well as focus on the positive activities that parents should do.

The most common poor-parenting behaviours:

1. Doing too much: We all know that kids need to learn to fend for themselves and stand on their own two feet. Independence is the aim for parents. Learn to delegate.

2. Winning arguments: The need to win arguments and prove that we are right harms relationships and creates fertile ground for conflict. Focus on the things that matter.

3. Expecting too little: Expectations are tricky. Too high and kids can give up. Too low and kids will meet them. Pitch them at their developmental age.

4. Speaking when angry: Speaking is our default mechanism regardless of our emotional state. When we are angry kids don’t listen. They pick up our venom but not our words. Choose the right time to speak to kids.

5. Failing to give proper recognition: It’s easy to take children’s good behaviour and their contributions to the family for granted. Catch kids doing the right thing.

6. Playing favourites: Children usually know who’s the favoured or preferred child in their family. Your discipline and expectations give this away. Share the parenting so you share the favouritism.

7. Letting kids drop out of the family: In small families, every child has a bedroom, which means isolation is easy to achieve. Teenagers, in particular, tend to prefer their own company rather than the company of peers and parents. Put rituals in place and make sure everyone turns up to meal-time.

8. Taking the easy way out: It’s a quirk of modern life that as parents get busier with work and other things there is a tremendous temptation to avoid arguments by giving into kids. Hang in there when you know it’s the right thing to do.

9. Judging yourself too harshly: Parents are generally hard markers of themselves. Kids are more forgiving of their parents’ blunders than their parents. Parent your family as if it’s a large one.

10. Solving too many problems: Good parents try to solve their children’s problems. A forgotten school lunch is a child’s problem not a parent’s problem. Pose problems for kids rather than solve them.

11. Confusing help with responsibility: We all love it when our children help at home, but this shouldn’t be confused with taking responsibility. A child who gets himself up in the morning is learning to take responsibility. If you want a child to be responsible give him real responsibility.

12. Not listening: There is something inherent in most parents that makes us help children when they are in need or get stuck. We want to talk and help them solve their problems and become unstuck. Listen first and then decide if you need to speak.

13. Taking yourself too seriously: There is a lot of pressure placed on parenting and that can weigh us down and take the joy out of the job. Take time to enjoy the little things.

14. Parenting the individual: Small family parenting is almost always an individual endeavour. It’s worth remembering that sibling relationships (if children have siblings) can be just as influential as the parent-child relationship. It will almost certainly outlast the parent-child relationship. Lead the group, manage the child.

15. Refusal to express regret: Sometimes parents can work themselves into a tight corner after they’ve said something out of anger or desperation. One parent I know cancelled Christmas out of desperation and refused to admit she was wrong. Sometimes you need to acknowledge your mistakes and start over again.

16. Failing to communicate: Okay, so you are about to talk to your children about sexuality and relationships. What process do you use? Where will you hold that conversation? Establish communication processes and communication places well in advance of when you really need them.

17. Neglecting your own well-being: Many families operate under a child-first mentality, which places a lot of pressure and stress on parents. We happily drive kids to their leisure activities at the expense of our own. Carve out some time for your own interests and leisure pursuits.

18. Giving feedback at the wrong time: Timing is everything when we give kids feedback. If you give negative feedback, immediately after an event or action, you risk discouraging them. Use just-in-time prompts to remind them how to do something. Carefully choose your timing when you give feedback.

19. Clinging to the past: The ghosts from the past are strong, sometimes causing parents to put some of their problems onto their children. The problems we may have experienced growing up won’t necessarily be shared by our children.

20. Believing everything your children say: As loving parents, we want to trust our children and believe everything they tell us. Children are faulty observers and frequently only see one side of an issue. Help children process what happens to them and see issues from every side.


 

Kylie Wolstencroft
Wellbeing Coordinator / Registered Psychologist

Community news

We are pleased to provide a community news section in our news highlighting events in the wider Launceston community that may be of interest to families. Included this week:

  • City Mission Bookfest – books, games, puzzles, DVD’s and more.  Help support winter relief
  • Youth Speakout – 12-18 years. A chance to contribute your say on reconcilliation.
Go to Community News

 

Principal’s Message Term 2 Week 7

Real World Learning

As much as I dislike the term ‘Real World’, as if education is a figment of the imagination, this week saw our students in Years 7 and 10 involved in integrated learning beyond the restriction of traditional subject areas and even the school gates – in the Real World. Year 7 students have spent the week at Inveresk and around Launceston on SOC2City and Year 10 students embarked on their STEAM Program. These programs provided students with an opportunity to use what they know and the skills they have amassed in a range of new ways. It’s a chance to work with others and use complementary talents to create something ingenious and unique.

So why are the SOC2City and STEAM programs so important? In 2017 in the USA there was, for the first time ever, a decrease in the total number of unskilled jobs. People who left school early and didn’t get any qualifications were in or entering a job market that was shrinking. That’s because many unskilled jobs are being automated and performed by robots. For example, the largest area of employment of unskilled workers in 2017 in the USA was as a driver: trucks, delivery vans, taxis, Uber etc. And as we know, driverless vehicles are being trialled in countries all around the world.

Our Year 7 and 10 students will be entering the workforce anywhere between 2022 and 2030. By then the workforce landscape will have changed – there will still be many of the jobs that are present today that students may well be aspiring to but there’ll also be new jobs that are only just emerging. The type of roles that automation and artificial intelligence won’t be able to take over are the humanistic ones that involve such competencies as caring, creativity, ingenuity, design, complex problem solving and collaboration.

In these two programs students are engaged in truly inter-disciplinary multi-skilled projects that rely on them using all of these skills and coming up with truly original and creative ideas and solutions.

Students won’t be restricted to only using certain subject knowledge and skills, rather they will be, and are, encouraged to use all of their accumulated and collective wisdom. In the same way, that will very likely be the case in their future when they enter the workforce and commence their first career job – the first of many according to futurists.
In many ways, these programs have been a chance for our students to do some real ‘on the job’ training for a future we can only imagine.

Andy Müller
Principal

Vacation Care

The July Vacation Care program will run 1-22 July, from 8.00am – 5.30pm daily (Monday to Friday each week). Students aged 3-12 from Scotch Oakburn and from other local schools are able to attend and usual Government Childcare subsidies for out of school hours care apply.

The program is based in the Outside School Hours Care room on the Elphin Campus (entry from Erina St) and includes a range of off-campus experiences as well as campus-based activities. The full program will be available online or from the Junior School reception from early next week.

Download the program and booking form here

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School
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Welcome to College news. News is displayed in date order as received with most recent at the top.  You can SEARCH for a specific article using the search box above.

You can FILTER the news to view those article applicable to your child/ren’s school (Junior, Middle or Senior) or those that are of specific interest to you.

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Principal’s Message Term 2 Week 8

Learning How to Learn

The difference in the futures of our young people compared to those of 50 or even 30 years ago, is that change is occurring not just at a rapid rate but rapidly accelerating. As the future for today’s students unfolds, it will appear far different from that which we are experiencing today. So we are preparing our students for a somewhat murky future, one that lacks the clarity of past generations. What is clear though is that learning how to learn will be vitally important, more so than ever before.

In the 90’s the trend in education was of Learning Styles – Visual, Audio and Kinaesthetic. The idea was that we all had a particular learning style and, taken further, that teachers were supposed to teach every lesson to every different learning style in the classroom. What the theory behind this concept actually said was, we all have a preferred learning style, be aware of it; it is a strength, but make sure that you practice other ways of learning so you have the ability to learn in a variety of ways. Then, when presented with a problem or concept, students have a number of different strategies to tackle it in order to find a solution.

Recent, however, research has found no scientific evidence to support this concept.

Regardless of whether we agree with the concept of learning styles or not, what I hope we all agree on is that we want our young people to have a range of ways and strategies to help them with their learning. In educating our students for their future we must all be nurturing their ability in ‘Learning How to Learn’. If a student struggles to spell a word, solve a problem or understand a concept, they need to be able to employ other ways to do so. Finding information has never been easier, but the ability of a person to move their learning forward, to be a valuable team member and contribute to the learning dynamic in each educational setting all feeds into a person’s confidence, courage, tenacity, sense of responsibility and self-awareness.

This vision of someone who can adapt their learning to the current situation brings to my mind people such as Michaelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, who were painters, sculptors, engineers, architects, creators and inventors – whatever was required by the circumstances at the time. We must make sure that our students don’t put themselves, or allow themselves to be put, in a box and categorised by the notion of a predisposed, inflexible thinking style.

Andy Müller
Principal

 

Term 3 & 4 Early Learning enrolment

The new Term 3 Early Learning class commences on Wednesday 24 July. This is an opportunity for children who have recently turned three to have a gentle transition into school in this two day per week class (Wednesday and Friday) for Term 3 and 4.

There are still some places available in this class. Families interested in enrolment starting in July or during Term 3 (current College families with younger siblings or families new to the College) should contact Nardia Deverell on (03) 6336 3407 or nardia.deverell@soc.tas.edu.au or Junior School reception for further details.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

End of Term

All Junior School classes close for the winter break at 3.00pm on Friday 28 June. After School Care closes at 6.00pm on this day.

The Elphin Campus reception closes at 4.30pm on 28 June and reopens at 8.00am on Monday 22 July. The school can be contacted via the Penquite reception which is open during normal office hours throughout the holiday period.

The Vacation Care program commences on Monday 1 July and runs from 8.00am – 5.30pm Monday to Friday for the full three week break and on Monday 22 July. Download the program and booking form here.

All classes resume for Term 3 on Tuesday 23 July.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Learning in the dark

Thank you to all the Early Learning Elphin students and families who were able to contribute to such an exciting evening session inside and outside the classrooms on Thursday evening. On a perfect evening – dark early (no moon), crisp winter air, clear skies – the students were able make their own lanterns to help explore and experience their school as it is during the night, to search for nocturnal creatures, and to view Jupiter and the stars in the night sky through a very powerful telescope.

Tonight, Prep students and families are hoping for clear skies again for their winter solstice stargazing session with the Northern Valleys Astronomy Club members and their telescopes.

Thank you to all staff involved in planning these experiences, and particularly to our resident astronomer Mrs Katrina Edmunds.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Mid Winter Party is coming!

 

The invitations have gone out and bookings have started.  We are excited to invite the entire College community, past and present to our Mid Winter Party. This is a great opportunity for parents of all year levels to catch up and make new friends.

Being held at Volvo Cars Launceston, we invite you to dress in your favourite smart & casual outfit but include a “touch of tartan” if you can!

A stand-up event, there will be beverages on arrival and substantial canapes throughout the evening. There will be a cashless bar for extra drinks so bring your card.

To all the new families who have recently joined the Scotch Oakburn College community, and for those who may not be aware, babysitters (who are staff at the College) are available so you can join the party! For more information about how to utilise this babysitting option please contact Nardia Deverell on 6336 3407 or Nardia.Deverell@soc.tas.edu.au.

Grab your tartan, book your tickets and we look forward to seeing you!

 

Book Now

Senior School Round Square

As Artificial Intelligence (AI) becomes more embedded in our everyday life it is good to give some thought to the benefits and costs associated with this. At the recent Senior School Round Square meeting Year 11 student Greta Brown ran a thought-provoking examination of the AI industry, looking at who is driving the growth of AI and discussing some of the ethical questions surrounding the industry. She notes that many of the developers of AI are American or Chinese males, and this can create biases in AI programs that may subtly disadvantage minority groups or women. The relationships between private AI companies and governments around the world was also explored, with discussion being had on the implications for the privacy and safety of individual citizens as AI becomes more prolific.

Mark Hassell
Dean of Students

/ Round Square, Senior School

Taking opportunities

Having the courage to accept responsibility is a cornerstone for all learners of all ages!  This week as I reconnect with Senior School students and their learning community, I have been “walking the talk” in regards to taking opportunities!

For all of us, as life-long learners, an aspiration is to be courageous and to accept responsibility.  Without courage, we won’t know what learnings will emerge from the experience, or what we will benefit from it.  Carol Dweck (researcher on Growth Mindsets) highlights that this ‘courage’ or growth mindset provides greater connection to learning and experiences, leading to the development of a ‘benefit mindset’.  The belief and actions embedded in this are to reward the learner to give to others first.

For our TCE students, I encourage you all to continue to take responsibility, accept the challenges and grab the feedback and learning from your Mid-Year Exams.  This attitude (growth mindset) will enable you to grow as a learner during Semester Two.

For Year 10 students, the opportunities to collaborate with your STEAM Projects has provided learning challenges.  From concept and design-based thinking to clarifying a concept ‘pitch’ to a business case.  Forecasting future learning environments, these skills will certainly be in all aspects of learning and work life.

For Year 9 students, being the best you can be every day is highlighted through your understanding of a key value, ‘Integrity”. Being aware and supportive of others is a significant part of this. During Semester Two several opportunities to develop this value will be provided both on campus and beyond.  I encourage you to have the courage to take the opportunities!

Ben Green
Acting Deputy Principal/Head of Senior School

/ Senior School

Professor Rob McWilliams visits the College

This week the College has hosted Professor Rob McWilliams as an artist and clinician in residence.  Professor McWilliams, or Doctor Rob, as the students called him worked with musicians across the Junior, Middle and Senior Schools providing wonderful learning experiences for students and Music staff.

He was Professor of Music and Director of Bands and Instrumental Music Education at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh from 1996 where he also served as Head of Music from 2011 to 2014.  He has taught, conducted and presented at major music conferences in Japan, Hong Kong, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Europe, China, all states of Australia.  In early 2015 he relocated to Brisbane, Australia where he is currently working for Yamaha Music Australia as their Education Outreach Clinician.  It is through his work with Yamaha Music Australia that enabled him to work the College’s musicians.

Dr Rob shared his wealth of knowledge and skills with our band and orchestra students, and I know that they learnt a great deal from Dr Rob and are inspired to continue their music making.

Stephen King
Head of Visual and Performing Arts

Rowing Coaches (Junior and Senior)

Scotch Oakburn rowing is a well-established and committed sport within our College, offering students the opportunity to be part of a long-held tradition of competitive rowing.

The College is seeking expressions of interest for Rowing Coaches who would welcome the opportunity to be part of our rowing program, Under 13 to Open squads for both boys and girls. Coaches are paid an honorarium depending on the age group.

For further information and copy of the Position Description and Selection Criteria, please direct enquiries to the Director of Rowing, Jamie Breden on 0438 038 773 or via email Jamie.Breden@soc.tas.edu.au.

Expressions of interest close Friday 19 July 2019.

 

Winter sport in full swing

This Saturday 22 June will see our Girls and Boys AFL first teams play in their respective finals.

The girls will play against Marist College in Burnie starting at 11.00am for the NSATIS Shield. If successful, the team will then play against The Fahan school from Hobart for the SATIS State Final. Our boys are playing St Patricks College at St Patricks in the SATIS Semi Final starting at 11.00am. Well done to both teams in making these finals and to the work of Persons-in-Charge Fiona Taylor and Bo Power, and coaches Paul McKendrick (girls) and Andrew McLean (boys) for their efforts in mentoring the students.

The College cross country team will be competing in the All Schools Cross Country Carnival being held on Tuesday 2 July at Symmons Plains. We have 48 competitors which is wonderful considering it is the first week of Scotch Oakburn school holidays. Teachers Julie Kemp and Andrew Robinson will be looking after the team.

Our College badminton team will also finish first in the NSATIS competition and finals will be played early in Term 3. Congratulations to Person–in–Charge of Badminton Angela Vaughan and her team on their efforts.

Netball, soccer and hockey have been up and running during Term 2 and will continue into Term 3 with NSATIS competitions. With hockey particularly, matches go ahead through rain, hail or sunshine, therefore players, coaches and Persons-in–Charge Fabrice Dauchez and Jane Gregg are thanked. Netball coaches on frosty Saturday mornings and soccer coaches on cold afternoon training and games are also thanked.

Fitness students have also been working hard under the watchful eyes of Lorna Wilson and John Poynter. The fitness centre has been packed to the rafters with students embarking on their fitness program.

The Scotch Oakburn athletics squad has been announced and training is underway leading up to the NSATIS and SATIS carnivals held during September. Person-in-Charge of Athletics, Andrew Robinson, and Paul McKendrick are supervising the squad and the team will be well prepared for the carnivals.

Congratulations to all students participating in their chosen sports and to staff and coaches for their efforts during the winter months. It is a team effort.

Rob Jeffery
Sports Administrator

 

/ Middle School, Senior School

Launceston Competitions

Our music students have been very successful at this year’s Launceston Competitions with many individuals and ensembles achieving outstanding results.  Many of the results have been published in recent weeks.  Another of our successful students was Layla Dyson-Oliver (Year 6) who received a Highly Commended Award in the Modern Vocal section.

Kael (Year 12) and Violet Haysom (Year 6) have also enjoyed success.

Kael received the following places, 1st Woodwind solo 18 years and under on clarinet, 1st Woodwind solo open age on bagpipes and 2nd Woodwind Teacher/Student duo 18 years and under on bagpipes.  Violet achieved 2nd Woodwind solo (primary) on clarinet and a Highly commended in her vocal solo.

Kael and Violet achieved 1st  place in Woodwind Duo 18 years and under with Kael on bagpipes and Violet on the tenor drum.

Stephen King
Head of Visual and Performing Arts

/ Middle School, Senior School

ANU National Indigenous Summer School program

The ANU National Indigenous Summer School runs every December between 7 and 14 December. This is a week-long camp where current students in Years 10 and 11 can experience what it is like to be a university student. They can elect to be placed in the Humanities and Social Sciences stream or the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine stream. All expenses are paid for by the ANU.

For more information visit the webpage –http://www.anu.edu.au/students/communities-events/national-indigenous-summer-school.

For more information download the flyer here – ANU-NISS Flyer-June-2019

 

/ Senior School

Collegian Sarah Cabrol-Douat to perform piano recital

Former Scotch Oakburn student Sarah Cabrol-Douat nee Gunton (’95) will be presenting a Piano Recital on Saturday 13 July at 3 pm in the beautiful Launceston City Baptist Church.  The recital will feature the music of Bach, Beethoven, Chopin and Medtner.

After having been spirited off to Moscow at age 15, Sarah has received a performance Degree from the Moscow Conservatorium, an Advanced Diploma from the École Normale in Paris and a Performance and Research Masters Degree from the Royal College in London.

She is now based in Paris where she works, plays and lives with her young French family.

Very consciously Tasmanian at heart, Sarah returns as often as she can to visit her Australian family and friends and to share her music with a community that will always be close to her heart!

If you are unable to attend on this date, you may like to hear play at the Kettering Hall in the south at 3 pm on Sunday, 7 July.

Stephen King
Head of Visual and Performing Arts

Year 8 Education Outdoors

This week 8X participated in their “Odyssey” experience in the Fingal Valley.  Despite some challenging weather on the first few days, the students enjoyed engaging in learning about what makes “good” women and men and connecting with local indigenous people.  The students also enjoyed a light bushwalk through the area.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

SOC2City

Last week our Year 7 students participated in SOC2City.

The students were based at UTAS School for Architecture for the week where they explored the City of Launceston, researched liveability factors, met with a number of key mentors and investigated and explored various problems such as access to services, life expectancy, carbon footprint, safety and health and wellbeing. The students then presented a “pitch” to a panel of judges who were looking for Australia’s most liveable regional city.

The students enjoyed learning in a different environment and having exposure to augmented reality technology through an App on their device called HP Reveal.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

East Coast Choir community program

Once again this year, our Year 5 and Year 6 students are invited to participate in the East Coast Choir community program.  This year we will be travelling to St Mary’s District School on Thursday, 1 August and schools from the East Coast will be travelling to Scotch Oakburn College on Friday, 16 August.  Justin Smith (Junior School teacher) has written a song, You and Me (working title), which we are hoping to record with harmonies, instrumentalists, countermelodies, and choreography. This is a very exciting opportunity and we would encourage all our Year 6 students to become involved.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

 

/ Middle School

What does integrity mean?

This week’s Connect@Elphin for Years 2-5 was led by Year 5 Hodgetts who focused our attention on integrity. Through personal examples and video clips of integrity in action, both at and beyond school, the Year 5’s skilfully highlighted the meaning and importance of integrity in our everyday actions and especially our interactions with others.

Integrity is one of the 24 key character strengths identified in the positive psychology work of Martin Seligman and others. For readers interested in learning more about character strengths a starting point could be https://positivepsychology.com/classification-character-strengths-virtues/.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Middle School Environmental Committee project

The Middle School Environmental committee have been busy collecting 2L milk cartons to build their greenhouse over the Middle School veggie garden.  While they have been doing a fabulous job, they still require additional milk cartons in order to be able to complete their project and design.  Milk cartons can be handed in at Middle School Reception at any time.

Thank you for your ongoing support.

(Please note the picture is an example of what could be constructed.  Construction has not yet started.)

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

NIJSSA Cross Country

On Wednesday, 19 June a number of Year 6 students participated in the NIJSSA Cross Country held at Windsor Park.  Our Year 6 students represented the school exceptionally well and demonstrated excellent sportsmanship throughout the day.  A special mention to Sophie Marshall who won the Year 6 girls event.  Congratulations to all students who competed.  We are very proud of your efforts.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

Mama Paulina School of Hope

The Middle School sponsor four children, Emmanuel, Scevia, Loriet and Carolyn, from the Mama Paulina School of Hope, a school for orphans and very poor children in a remote village in Kenya called Mukuro.

There are currently 120 students who attend the school; however, these numbers vary daily due to parents not being able to afford to pay the school fees, sickness and hardship.  Emmanuel, Scevia, Loriet and Carolyn have written letters to us, thanking us for our support.  These children are all learning to read and write and are very excited to receive letters from our students.  Please encourage your child to get involved by writing a letter.

We are looking forward to establishing a long term partnership with the school.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

 

/ Middle School

Student Achievements

Year 10 students Liam Canny and Zac Morris have been named in the Tasmania Devils NAB Rising Stars U16 Championships team.  Liam and Zac will travel to Sydney on 22 June to play the Northern Territory as part of the championships.

Kate Croft
Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School

/ Senior School

Artstart

Congratulations to the following Junior School students who have their work included in the QVMAG Artstart exhibition: Quaint, Quirky & Peculiar.

Year 1 painting: Gwyneth McLoughlin

Year 3 paintings: Lottie Cooke, Cassie Richman and Flynn McLoughlin

Year 4 relief prints: Cy Eberle, Scarlett Glover, Zoe O’Connor, Eva Cetti, Lily Murdoch, Charlie Palmer

This exhibition will be on show at QVMAG – Wellington St until November.

Suzanne Creese
Teacher

/ Junior School

Cross Country

Courage, determination, grit and teamwork were high on the list of character traits demonstrated in a fantastic team effort by all our runners at the NIJSSA Cross Country meeting at Windsor Park this week. Congratulations to all team members on their contribution to Scotch Oakburn’s overall 2nd place finish on the day, as well as to Nicky Reid and all staff who coached and supported the team.

Team placings were achieved by:

Year 3 Girls 3rd, Year 3 Boys 3rd, Year 4 Girls 1st, Year 5 Girls 3rd, Year 5 Boys 2nd, Year 6 Girls 2nd, Year 6 Boys 2nd.

Top 10 individual placings (in fields of 54 starters from 9 schools) were achieved by:

Year 3:
Girls – Anja Jacobs 5th, George Lowe 10th
Boys – Flynn McLoughlin 9th, Grady Frith 10th

Year 4
Girls  – Liv Dyson-Oliver 2nd, Isla Irani 3rd, Chloe Horsman 4th, Ailish Barron 5th
Boys – Ben Giasli 7th

Year 5
Girls – Bella Shaw 1st, Abigail Rigney 5th
Boys  –  Will Nichols 7th, Abhinav Sundaram 10th

Year 6
Girls  Sophie Marshall 1st, Mia Green 8th
Boys  Henry Jones 2nd

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

TCE Play

Congratulations to the TCE Drama and TCE Theatre Performance students who crafted an outstanding presentation of ‘Play-On’.

Thank you for the support from the College community for this presentation. Special thanks to the Director, Mrs Kathryn Gray and to the Technical Support Crew, Miss Katie Hill and student Jonty Darcy (Year 11).

Ben Green
Acting Deputy Principal/Head of Senior School

 

/ Senior School

Learning to be a Curator at QVMAG in Launceston

Isabella Wilson in Year 5 was recently selected as one of just five primary age students in the north of the state to participate as a guest curator of the Term 2 primary age Artstart exhibition at The Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallery in Launceston titled: Quaint, Quirky & Peculiar.

This innovative learning opportunity enabled Isabella to experience in an authentic setting, each stage of the process involved in curating and opening an art exhibition.  She demonstrated outstanding ability to work collaboratively with her peers, listening to reasoning and offering thoughtful and insightful justifications for her choices.  Isabella committed to assisting with a follow-up workshop where she helped with aesthetic decisions about selecting suitable colours of backing papers, making necessary adjustments to the final presentation of each artwork selected and deciding on the order of hanging based on how the works best related to each other.  Isabella also spoke at the opening of this exhibition.  Congratulations Isabella on your outstanding work!

Suzanne Creese
Teacher

 

/ Junior School

Student Achievement

Congratulations to Samantha Kirschbaum (Year 5) who has enjoyed an outstanding month in drama and music. In May she performed nine shows with the Launceston Players in their production of George Orwell’s 1984, playing the role of Parsons Girl.

In the recent Launceston Competitions vocal sections, she won first place in both the Selection from Stage or Film Musical, 12 years and under, and the Patricia Sargison Memorial Solo, 10 years and under.  She was also selected by the adjudicator to receive the Encouragement Award for Musical Theatre, 18 years and under, with a trophy and prize money donated by the Launceston Musical Society.

Lachie Wright
Head fo Junior School

/ Junior School

20 Things Parents Need to Quit

Author – Michael Grose 


 

Most parenting experts are committed to positive action to maintain forward momentum. Half of the parents I have met don’t need to learn what to do, they need to learn what to stop.

Parenting experts spend a lot of time helping parents learn what to do. But we don’t spend enough time teaching parents what to stop. There are a lot of good reasons for this. Probably most prominent is the fact that most parenting experts are committed to positive action to maintain forward momentum. If you are a parent or an educator who works with parents, then it’s helpful to focus on ‘What to Stop’ as well as focus on the positive activities that parents should do.

The most common poor-parenting behaviours:

1. Doing too much: We all know that kids need to learn to fend for themselves and stand on their own two feet. Independence is the aim for parents. Learn to delegate.

2. Winning arguments: The need to win arguments and prove that we are right harms relationships and creates fertile ground for conflict. Focus on the things that matter.

3. Expecting too little: Expectations are tricky. Too high and kids can give up. Too low and kids will meet them. Pitch them at their developmental age.

4. Speaking when angry: Speaking is our default mechanism regardless of our emotional state. When we are angry kids don’t listen. They pick up our venom but not our words. Choose the right time to speak to kids.

5. Failing to give proper recognition: It’s easy to take children’s good behaviour and their contributions to the family for granted. Catch kids doing the right thing.

6. Playing favourites: Children usually know who’s the favoured or preferred child in their family. Your discipline and expectations give this away. Share the parenting so you share the favouritism.

7. Letting kids drop out of the family: In small families, every child has a bedroom, which means isolation is easy to achieve. Teenagers, in particular, tend to prefer their own company rather than the company of peers and parents. Put rituals in place and make sure everyone turns up to meal-time.

8. Taking the easy way out: It’s a quirk of modern life that as parents get busier with work and other things there is a tremendous temptation to avoid arguments by giving into kids. Hang in there when you know it’s the right thing to do.

9. Judging yourself too harshly: Parents are generally hard markers of themselves. Kids are more forgiving of their parents’ blunders than their parents. Parent your family as if it’s a large one.

10. Solving too many problems: Good parents try to solve their children’s problems. A forgotten school lunch is a child’s problem not a parent’s problem. Pose problems for kids rather than solve them.

11. Confusing help with responsibility: We all love it when our children help at home, but this shouldn’t be confused with taking responsibility. A child who gets himself up in the morning is learning to take responsibility. If you want a child to be responsible give him real responsibility.

12. Not listening: There is something inherent in most parents that makes us help children when they are in need or get stuck. We want to talk and help them solve their problems and become unstuck. Listen first and then decide if you need to speak.

13. Taking yourself too seriously: There is a lot of pressure placed on parenting and that can weigh us down and take the joy out of the job. Take time to enjoy the little things.

14. Parenting the individual: Small family parenting is almost always an individual endeavour. It’s worth remembering that sibling relationships (if children have siblings) can be just as influential as the parent-child relationship. It will almost certainly outlast the parent-child relationship. Lead the group, manage the child.

15. Refusal to express regret: Sometimes parents can work themselves into a tight corner after they’ve said something out of anger or desperation. One parent I know cancelled Christmas out of desperation and refused to admit she was wrong. Sometimes you need to acknowledge your mistakes and start over again.

16. Failing to communicate: Okay, so you are about to talk to your children about sexuality and relationships. What process do you use? Where will you hold that conversation? Establish communication processes and communication places well in advance of when you really need them.

17. Neglecting your own well-being: Many families operate under a child-first mentality, which places a lot of pressure and stress on parents. We happily drive kids to their leisure activities at the expense of our own. Carve out some time for your own interests and leisure pursuits.

18. Giving feedback at the wrong time: Timing is everything when we give kids feedback. If you give negative feedback, immediately after an event or action, you risk discouraging them. Use just-in-time prompts to remind them how to do something. Carefully choose your timing when you give feedback.

19. Clinging to the past: The ghosts from the past are strong, sometimes causing parents to put some of their problems onto their children. The problems we may have experienced growing up won’t necessarily be shared by our children.

20. Believing everything your children say: As loving parents, we want to trust our children and believe everything they tell us. Children are faulty observers and frequently only see one side of an issue. Help children process what happens to them and see issues from every side.


 

Kylie Wolstencroft
Wellbeing Coordinator / Registered Psychologist

Community news

We are pleased to provide a community news section in our news highlighting events in the wider Launceston community that may be of interest to families. Included this week:

  • City Mission Bookfest – books, games, puzzles, DVD’s and more.  Help support winter relief
  • Youth Speakout – 12-18 years. A chance to contribute your say on reconcilliation.
Go to Community News

 

Principal’s Message Term 2 Week 7

Real World Learning

As much as I dislike the term ‘Real World’, as if education is a figment of the imagination, this week saw our students in Years 7 and 10 involved in integrated learning beyond the restriction of traditional subject areas and even the school gates – in the Real World. Year 7 students have spent the week at Inveresk and around Launceston on SOC2City and Year 10 students embarked on their STEAM Program. These programs provided students with an opportunity to use what they know and the skills they have amassed in a range of new ways. It’s a chance to work with others and use complementary talents to create something ingenious and unique.

So why are the SOC2City and STEAM programs so important? In 2017 in the USA there was, for the first time ever, a decrease in the total number of unskilled jobs. People who left school early and didn’t get any qualifications were in or entering a job market that was shrinking. That’s because many unskilled jobs are being automated and performed by robots. For example, the largest area of employment of unskilled workers in 2017 in the USA was as a driver: trucks, delivery vans, taxis, Uber etc. And as we know, driverless vehicles are being trialled in countries all around the world.

Our Year 7 and 10 students will be entering the workforce anywhere between 2022 and 2030. By then the workforce landscape will have changed – there will still be many of the jobs that are present today that students may well be aspiring to but there’ll also be new jobs that are only just emerging. The type of roles that automation and artificial intelligence won’t be able to take over are the humanistic ones that involve such competencies as caring, creativity, ingenuity, design, complex problem solving and collaboration.

In these two programs students are engaged in truly inter-disciplinary multi-skilled projects that rely on them using all of these skills and coming up with truly original and creative ideas and solutions.

Students won’t be restricted to only using certain subject knowledge and skills, rather they will be, and are, encouraged to use all of their accumulated and collective wisdom. In the same way, that will very likely be the case in their future when they enter the workforce and commence their first career job – the first of many according to futurists.
In many ways, these programs have been a chance for our students to do some real ‘on the job’ training for a future we can only imagine.

Andy Müller
Principal

Vacation Care

The July Vacation Care program will run 1-22 July, from 8.00am – 5.30pm daily (Monday to Friday each week). Students aged 3-12 from Scotch Oakburn and from other local schools are able to attend and usual Government Childcare subsidies for out of school hours care apply.

The program is based in the Outside School Hours Care room on the Elphin Campus (entry from Erina St) and includes a range of off-campus experiences as well as campus-based activities. The full program will be available online or from the Junior School reception from early next week.

Download the program and booking form here

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School
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