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Welcome to College news. News is displayed in date order as received with most recent at the top.  You can SEARCH for a specific article using the search box above.

You can FILTER the news to view those article applicable to your child/ren’s school (Junior, Middle or Senior) or those that are of specific interest to you.

Note: You can select more than one filter option at a time eg Junior and Senior.

Principal’s Message Term 3 Week 4

This week we celebrated Science Week across the College with many different and exciting activities for students of all ages. These heightened our awareness that everything around us involves Science: the note played on an instrument, the cooking of food, the curving path of a soccer ball, life-giving respiration, the operation of an engine, why ice is less dense than liquid water, and so the list goes on, ad infinitum. Many of the scientific principles that we take for granted today were proposed centuries ago by early pioneering scientists.

The earliest people whom society recognised as scientists were called Natural Philosophers of Ancient Greece. They discussed and hypothesised about the world around them. Their discussions were rarely challenged by experimentation and at times their logic led to misconceptions. For example, it was ‘logical’ to think that if an object was heavier, it fell to the ground faster. This could have been easily debunked by experimentation but for some reason, it was not challenged for centuries. Some theories though were well ahead of their time and often it was only the lack of scientific equipment that held the theory back from general acceptance.

Democritus (460 – 370 BC), proposed that all matter was composed of atoms that are physically indivisible. However, Aristotle and Plato rejected the theories of Democritus, instead accepting the theory of Empedocles who said that all matter was composed of four elements: fire, air, water, and earth.

Another Greek, Aristarchus of Samos (c. 310 – c. 230 BCE) hypothesised that the Sun, not the Earth, was the fixed centre of the universe, and all the planets revolved around it. Eighteen centuries later Copernicus, independently, proposed the same idea, risking ridicule at a time when most people believed that the Earth was the centre of the Universe.

Eratosthenese of Cyrene (276 – 195 BC) was the first person to calculate the circumference of the earth (to within 10% of the currently accepted value), the tilt of the earth’s axis and the distance from the earth to the sun. Later, in the 10th century AD, Abū Rayḥān Al-Bīrūnī, a pioneering Muslim scientist calculated the circumference to within 4% of the true value.

Through the Dark Ages in Europe, much of scientific learning was kept alive through the schools and universities of the Middle East. Universities and rulers had immense libraries and the thirst for knowledge was astounding. One regional ruler is reported to have offered the mass of gold, equal to the weight of the person who could bring him a text that was not currently in his library.

As an aside, Michelangelo connected science and art – maybe he started the STEAM concept? He lived during the renaissance and risked imprisonment, and possibly death, by performing human autopsies, which were illegal at the time, to improve his knowledge of the human anatomy and so be able to create more life-like artworks. Today we are still in awe of his many works, such as ‘The David’ and the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Similarly, Galileo risked being excommunicated when he supported Copernicus’ theory of the solar system.

Gradually, science has become defined more by experimentation and numerical formulas than philosophical musings to explain the behaviour of our world. Today the fields of Science are many and they all demand experimentation to produce data and evidence to confirm observations and hypotheses that ultimately lead to the acceptance of theories.

Andy Müller
Principal

Senior School Play – Away

Scotch Oakburn College presents Away

We invite you to come along to this year’s Senior School play, Away by Michael Gow.

A magical play every Australian can relate to … set in the summer of 1967-68. It has been named one of Australia’s Classic plays, depicting life in Australia post World War 2 and in the midst of The Vietnam War.

It’s a tragically beautiful play with resonance on so many levels. Includes styles of realism, comedy, fantasy, Shakespearean and a play-within-a play.

Fun, crazy and comedic but behind the veneer of holiday fanfare, Gold Coast glitz, and high school theatrics are three families that are scared, angered, and fracturing.

Please note: the topics and themes in this performance make it unsuitable for young children. We recommend Middle and Senior School students and above.

Performances: Wednesday 4 September, Thursday 5 September and Friday 6 September

Time: 7.00pm
Location: Horton Auditorium, Performing Arts Centre
Cost: Adults $20 Students/Concession $15

Book seats now

 

/ Middle School, Senior School

Destination Moon: more missions, more science

The 2019 National Science Week theme engrossed students from Early Learning to Year 5 in classrooms and in conneXions this week. Learning in and through science was at the forefront for a significant part of the week’s learning program as integration of the three strands of the Australian Curriculum for Science – Science Understanding, Science Inquiry Skills and Science as a Human Endeavour – underpinned a range of exciting learning experiences in conneXions.

Missions to the moon in our very own lunar module (a scaled half-size model of the Apollo11 command module Columbia that took Neil Armstrong and two fellow astronauts to the moon and back 50 years ago), virtual reality moonwalks and space experiences through VR Goggles, creating interactive 3D augmented reality space pictures, walking on the moon or reading about the moon or other space facts while sitting on a simulation of the moon’s surface, constructing rockets and sculptures in the Maker Space, listening to astronauts in the International Space Station reading children’s books Rosie Revere Engineer or Ada Twist Scientist, exploring the Mars terrain using spheros, coding beebots and bluebots to go on deep space adventures, and learning more about the moon from displays of researched class work by Year 5 and Year 1 students, captured the interest of Junior School students throughout the week.

Thank you to the conneXions staff team led by Miranda Creak and Marissa Saville,  Brian Howie and the College Works staff, and other staff and students who contributed to such an exciting and productive week’s learning.

Science Week also featured a range of classroom and Claremont garden-based investigations and experiments for all ages, visits to Helix at the Penquite Campus for some classes, and science activities in the Outside School Hours Care Centre.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Book Week

From science to reading  – or just how much do these subjects overlap?

Next week, 17-23 August is celebrated as Children’s Book Week in Australian schools. This brings our priority focus next week to ‘Reading: My Secret Power’, this year’s Book Week theme. All Junior School students, from 3-year-olds to Year 5, will experience a range of engaging reading experiences, including workshops with published children’s authors.

Book Week is also another opportunity for families at home to enjoy reading and sharing books together. We know just how valuable for children’s learning – especially young children – being read to regularly is. Parents are most welcome to visit conneXions to learn more about Book Week and to share a book with their child(ren) – next week or at any time.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Junior School Chess

On Tuesday 12 August, our Junior chess team competed in the final ChessKid tournament for 2019. 17 of our Junior School students represented Scotch Oakburn beautifully and came away with first place in Division B and second place in Division A. For our Year 5 representatives, well done on your last competition with the Junior School. Thank you for your leadership and willingness to coach our younger players.

In Division B, Grady Frith placed second overall by winning 5 ½ out of 7 games. Alongside this amazing effort were James Van Der Aa and Gomanth Anand Lokesh who placed equal third with a score of 5 out of 7. Gomanth also received an award for the most improved player in this division. Well done to the B team who placed first overall!

In Division A, Amelie Geddes received an award for top girl and James Walker was awarded most improved player. Our A team placed second overall which automatically qualifies 5 players to the state final. Players chosen to represent Scotch Oakburn are yet to be finalised. Full results can be found here.

There were many proud moments, highlights and learning opportunities shared. The State final will be held 21 October.

Junior School Chess will continue to run each Tuesday at lunchtime in conneXions for all interested students!

Rebecca Ballard
Teacher

 

/ Junior School

Mid Winter Party

Thanks to everyone in the College community who joined us last Friday night for our annual Mid-Winter Party. It was a great night and wonderful to see so many new faces there.

Special thanks to our current parents – Ben Newman, Chris Veevers, Selena Palmer & Cathryn Cocker for their support in making the venue look so amazing. To Rob Youl (current parent) and Sam Woolley (’99) for their tunes and to Fred Lester (’01), Charles Headlam (’14), Lachie Stewart (Year 11) and Joyce Williamson (past staff and past parent) for their fantastic “Ode to a Haggis”.  If you haven’t seen the video on Facebook it is definitely worth a look – https://www.facebook.com/ScotchOakburnCollege/videos/366742474249373/

Nicole Willcox
Community and Events Manager

Senior School Round Square

Are animals ours to use? More specifically, is it acceptable to use them to do tests on? These are some of the questions posed by Year 11 student Scarlett Veevers during this week’s Senior Round Square meeting.

Humans have used animals for thousands of years, be it horses for travel and farming, dogs for companionship and hunting, and domesticated animals for food and clothing. However, in recent history, humans have used animals for a variety of testing purposes, ranging from the safety of food additives and cosmetics through to the effectiveness of pharmaceuticals and military weapons. Some animals are genetically altered so they are guaranteed to get certain cancers or other diseases so that preventative drugs can be tested on them. Is this ethical? Do the benefits outweigh the costs?

There were plenty of opinions and different perspectives but no easy answers to a subject that continues to cause spirited debate in wider society.

On another note, our Senior Round Square students will be taking care of the food scrap composting from the Robert Dean Senior Student Centre and using it to feed several worm farms and to create compost for the veggie gardens behind the Helix. All students can assist in this process by ensuring that only food scraps go in the compost bin and that plastics and other rubbish either get recycled or go into a general waste bin.

Mark Hassell
Dean of Students

/ Round Square, Senior School

Fathers’ Day Breakfast

Fathers' Day breakfast

ONLY 1 WEEK LEFT TO BOOK!

This event always sells out – please book now to ensure you are not disappointed.

Please join the Year Level Parent Representatives and the wider College community for a relaxed casual Fathers’ Day Breakfast @ Laneway, Elphin Campus.

Enjoy barista-made coffee, breakfast goodies from the grazing table and gourmet breakfast buns.

As always, the aim of the occasion is to create a happy time for children to share with the adult males in their lives, be it dad, big brother, uncle, grandad, stepfather or a friend.

Date: Friday 30 August
Time: 7.30am – 8.30am
Venue: Laneway, Junior School, Elphin Campus. (There will be heating! If it rains we’ll be in the Mary Fox Performing Arts Centre, Elphin Campus)

BOOK NOW

Archives exhibition

We invite our community to attend the opening of our next s.p.a.c.e. gallery exhibition, curated by our College Archivist, Veronica Macno.

Traditions Combined: the amalgamation of Oakburn College and Scotch College is an exhibition that celebrates the 40th anniversary of the amalgamation of Oakburn College and Scotch College. The establishment of Scotch Oakburn College in 1979 can be traced back to Horton College, the Methodist Ladies’ College, later known as Oakburn College, and to Scotch College.

Opening words will be provided by Senator Wendy Askew (’80), Liberal Senator for Tasmania, who was present as a student during the amalgamation.

The exhibition will include a selection of material from the Scotch Oakburn College Archive Collection.

Opening: Friday 23 August 5.30pm
Location: s.p.a.c.e. Gallery, Performing Arts Centre, Penquite Campus
RSVP to attend the opening by following this link.

The exhibition continues until Thursday 19 September.  We encourage our community to drop in any time between 9.00am and 5.00pm Monday to Friday during this time.

 

Move Well, East Well

Scotch Oakburn Junior School has once again been accredited as a Move Well – Eat Well School, having met the Statewide program’s criteria around the promotion of healthy drinking and eating in lunchboxes and through the tuckshop, alongside a strong Health and Physical Education program and associated activities for active play.

Coordinated by the State Department for Health and Human Services, ‘Move Well Eat Well promotes a healthier Tasmania in which children can enjoy healthy eating and physical activity every day. It contributes to a healthy lifestyle and to the prevention of a range of chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, some cancers and dental decay.’ Move Well Eat Well is celebrating its 10th year in primary schools.

Thank you to Mrs Catriona Hurd for her coordination of our Move Well Eat Well program, Cathy Maartensz in the Junior School Tuckshop, and to all staff, students and families for raising awareness and supporting this initiative.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Christina Booth workshops

BookWeek started early for some of our Junior School students on Thursday when Christina Booth, a semi-regular artist in residence, visited our College. Year 3 and 4 students followed on from classroom learning and delved deeper into Christina’s newest picture book, One Careless Night.  Christina created this beautiful, but heartbreaking picture book to tell the story of Australia’s last thylacine (Tasmanian tiger), which died in captivity in Hobart Zoo. By sharing this story of extinction with the world, Christina hopes readers will think about how humans can learn from the past to inform the future – extinction is forever. We finished with a drawing workshop and students created these wonderful Thylacine sketches with Christina’s guidance.

Christina also presented to Year 1 and 2 students but this time, Christina linked with the current Year 2 Narrative writing focus with a writing workshop. Using Mary Fox Hall in a totally new way, students built upon classroom writing in a shared workshop. By using picture stimulus images and ‘waking up the right side of our brains’ we brainstormed and asked ourselves questions (Who? What? Where? When? and most importantly, Why?) to develop some story ideas. Christina talked about how a story is like a seed; it needs to grow and change, discarding its outer layers and developing over time. Students were excited to take their writing back to their learning environments and revisit their brainstorming, asking more questions to construct further story ideas.

For more information please visit the dash here https://thedash.soc.tas.edu.au/homepage/12751.

Kylie Brewster
21st Century Technologies

/ Junior School

Student Achievement

Congratulations to Lachie Frame (Year 8) who was awarded the Tasmanian Junior Lifesaver of the Year Award in an awards ceremony in Hobart at weekend.

This is selected from all Junior (14 and under) participants in the sport in Tasmania and covers all-round participation in competitions, patrols, club and community involvement, and knowledge of beach safety matters.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

Battle of the Houses – Singing Competition

Next Friday 23 August, the annual Middle and Senior School House Singing Competition will be held at 2.00pm in the Penquite HPEC.

Each House has been working very hard for the past month under the leadership of their House Captains on refining their chosen song and War Cry.   There will be limited seating for spectators, however, there will be plenty of standing room on the HPEC balcony. Parents are most welcome to attend. We also look forward to welcoming our Year 5 students to the Middle School to view the performances.

Kate Croft
Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School

 

/ Middle School, Senior School

Information Evening for 2020 Year 9 and 10 students and parents

On Wednesday, 21 August we are holding an important Information Evening, in the Horton Auditorium, for 2020 Year 9 and 10 students and parents, commencing at 7.00pm.

The purpose of the evening is to help students and parents manage their transition to the Scotch Oakburn Senior School.  In Years 9 and 10, students have a wide choice of subjects in our Electives Program.  The way this program operates and the opportunities for breadth of choice will be explained.  Heads of Departments of elective subjects will be present for informal discussions with individual parents and students after the presentation. The 2020 course handbook will be available on the evening.

Kate Croft
Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School

/ Middle School, Senior School

Year 7 Parent/Student/Teacher conferences

Year 7 Parent Student Teacher conferences will take place on Monday, 19 August.  Parents will soon receive communication regarding the online booking process.  Parents are asked to book 10-minute sessions with teachers.  The evening runs from 4.00pm – 8.00pm in the Middle School.  It is important that all parents and students attend these conferences.  If you feel that you require more than the scheduled 10 minutes to meet with a teacher, please contact the teacher you need to speak with directly and organise an alternative time to meet.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

Physical Pursuits hit the snow

On Wednesday 14 August our Year 10 Physical Pursuits class set off for an afternoon adventure to Ben Lomond Snow Sports.

Students were given the opportunity to ski or board, and if confident use the tows after a short lesson. All students gave it a red hot go and took to the snow with ease, learning the movements very quickly. In almost tropical conditions on the mountain, we spent a solid 3 hours out on the slopes, finishing up with a snow fight and some tobogganing. I would like to thank Mr Paul McKendrick for coming along as another body and for instructing the snowboarders. Thanks also to Mrs Debbie Eastley, Mr Shaun O’Loughlin, Mr Ben Green and Mts Kate Croft for helping to make the afternoon happen. Well done to the students on a great afternoon on Ben Lomond!

Ali Foot
Teacher

/ Senior School

Cows Create Careers

Each year the Year 8 students in the College are involved in a nationwide competition raising awareness of the importance of the Dairy industry. Today sees the arrival of the 2 calves, kindly provided by the Lawrence family, that we will be caring for over the next few months.

All Year 8 students will look at the biology of living things and the systems that work together for healthy life. This integrated unit of study will link a number of subject areas making links between the Dairy industry in Tasmania and classroom learning.

Fiona Taylor
Teacher

/ Middle School

Work Exposure in Government program

The 2019 Work Exposure in Government program (WEX) is taking place from Sunday 20 October to Friday 25 October.

Applications are open to high performing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in Years 10, 11 and 12 to learn about careers in the Australian Government. Students will be accompanied by teachers and mentors who provide cultural mentoring and leadership guidance.

All accommodation, transportation and meals will be provided.

Activities at WEX 2019 may include:

  • meeting government Ministers and parliamentarians
  • visits to the Australian Defence Force Academy and the Australian Federal Police headquarters
  • visits to national institutions such as the Australian War Memorial and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
  • a tour of Parliament House
  • a Careers Expo, where students can talk to representatives from a range of government agencies.

Through WEX, participants will learn about:

  • jobs and career opportunities in the Australian Government
  • applying for government jobs
  • how laws are made and enforced
  • support available to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees

Forms and eligibility criteria for student and teacher applications can be found here.

Applications must be submitted by emailing a scanned copy of the completed form to wex@pmc.gov.au by Friday 23 August 2019.

 

/ Senior School

Student Achievements

The State Short Course Championships were held in Hobart last weekend.  Quite a number of Scotch Oakburn students participated, many representing the Launceston Aquatic Club. Individual medals for College swimmers at that club were:

Dawson Howell (Year 12) – 2 Gold, 2 Silver
Jasmine Irani – 2 Gold, 3 Silver, 2 Bronze
Emily Mitchell (Year 8) – 6 Gold
Grace Mitchell (Year 6) – 1 Silver
Amy Muldoon (Year 9) – 1 Gold, 1 Bronze
Bella Muldoon (Year 6)  – 4 Gold, 1 Silver
Edward Watson (Year 11) – 2 Bronze

Emily Mithcell also sent new State records in the Girls 13 years 50 Backstroke and 100 Backstroke events.

If you have any other swimming results you would like to share please forward to your Head of School who will be happy to share.

Kate Croft
Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School

/ Middle School, Senior School

2019 Hanyuqiao (Tasmanian Chinese Speaking Competition)

Next Wednesday, 21 August, Year 7 and Year 8 students will compete via video conference in the 2019 Tasmanian Chinese Speaking Competition.  We wish Ryan Puccetti, Jade Cleary, Amelia Corrigan, Lachie Frame and Sasha Yuvchenko all the best in this competition.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

Science Titration competition

Students in senior school Science took part in Science Week activities by participating in the state challenge of the 2019 RACI Titration Competition. Scotch Oakburn College entered 15 teams of 3 students in the competition. Students from TCE Physical Science and Chemistry were involved and during this time 50 samples were analysed. State-wide there were over 150 teams from 20 schools and colleges across Tasmania participating in the annual competition.

Fiona Taylor
Science

/ Senior School

Japan Trip 2020

A reminder that deposits for the Japan Trip 2020 can now be paid at either Middle School or Senior School reception.  Deposits are required to secure your place on the trip and must be paid by 13 September.

Jenny Banbury
Coordinator of Japanese

/ Middle School, Senior School

Badminton win

Scotch Oakburn has won the NSATIS Badminton final. It has been many years since we have had an NSATIS win in this sport. In a very close encounter with Launceston Christian School our team won 9 games to 7. It was a fitting reward to our Year 12 captains Alice Cui and Casper Murrell who narrowly lost the final last year.

Played in a great sportsman like manner, players from both schools gave their best in an enthralling contest. Congratulations to the team on their season and for the way they have conducted themselves throughout the competition.

Rob Jeffery
Sport Administrator

/ Senior School

Sheep Poo – get your garden set for Spring!

The Scotch Oakburn College Rowing Club are once again selling their very popular sheep poo as a fundraiser:

Pick up and Pre-Order Delivery options available

Visit our rowing shed in Boland Street on Saturday’s commencing 10 August 2019 between 8.00am-12.00pm.

$5.00 per bag.

Pre-order by contacting Jamie Breden on 0438 038 773 or email Jamie.Breden@soc.tas.edu.au.

** FREE delivery 10 bags or more and Seniors FREE delivery with no minimum. **

Schools Cross Country

Over a six week period in Term 2, over 75 students from Early Learning to Year 12 participated in the Schools Cross Country series run by Newstead Athletics. Each Saturday we would meet at various locations to run, play and have fun with others. A very encouraging, community-oriented and fun environment for all who are wanting to get outside and keep active!

This year Scotch Oakburn College won the Junior division (Early Learning to Year 6) with 855 points and came second in the Senior division (Year 7-12) with 467 points. These combined achievements are a great reflection on all who took part, both for their athletic abilities as well as their encouragement and support to one another. All 75+ participants should be congratulated! We would also like to highlight some exciting individual results.

Under 7 Boys – William Rigney 4th
Under 9 Boys – Hamish Quill 1st
Under 9 Girls – Sarah Horsman 3rd, Chloe Hassell 4th
Under 11 boys – Ben Giasli 4th
Under 11 Girls – Chloe Horsman 4th, Isla Irani 5th
Under 13 boys – Henry Jones 2nd
Under 13 Girls – Bella Show 3rd
Under 15 Boys – Bryce Lawes 2nd, Hamish Fyffe 3rd
Under 15 Girls – Rebecca Clarke 2nd
Under 20 boys – Jonathan Clarke

A special thank you to Newstead Athletics for running such a great series for students to be part of!

We’d also like to thank all the families who have supported the School Series Cross Country! Your support is much appreciated!

Well done to all involved, keep up the running and we hope to see you all and more next year!

Becca Biggs
Teacher

Year 6 Canberra

A reminder to all year 6 students to return your confirmation of Student Details for your trip to Canberra to Middle School reception as soon as possible. It is important all details are up to date in the event of an emergency.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School  

/ Middle School

Chess

Scotch Oakburn had another fantastic day at the third Chess Tournament of the year, hosted at Launceston Grammar, Monday 12 August.

Our Primary teams had another very good day, with the Primary B team winning the Primary B title and the Primary A finishing 2nd. The future looks bright for chess at Scotch Oakburn.

Our Secondary team finished second behind a very strong Launceston College (LC) team. We have battled with LC the whole year and had won the first two tournaments. The State finals in October should also be very interesting.

Our Captain, Siddhant Kohli (Year 11) had a great tournament despite a surprise loss against a young and talented player who plays for a club. He finished equal 1st with 6 wins out of 7, notably beating the highest-ranked player of the competition.  Addison Djatschenko (Year 9) and James Banbury(Year 12) continued their good record this year with 5 wins and Mitchell Fulton (Year 8) scored 4 1/2.

Our players showed great determination, enthusiasm and grace. It is good to see growth in skills and confidence in our young players.

The State final will be played on Monday 21 October.

Fabrice Dauchez
Person-in-Charge of Chess

/ Middle School, Senior School

Community News

We are pleased to provide a community news section in our news highlighting events in the wider Launceston community that may be of interest to families. Included this week:

  • UTAS Psychology Research – 10-17 year olds needed for problem-solving research
  • Volunteers needed – Open House Launceston. See some amazing homes and give back to the community
Go to Community News

 

Leaving your kids home alone

Author:  Michael Grose


 

Schools holidays and after school times present challenges for families when parents work. Finding suitable care for children is tricky, particularly when usual arrangements fall over or kids tell you they are too old to be looked after.

A recent study showed that one in 10 Australian children under the age of twelve spend some part of a school holiday at home without supervision.

The legal age when a child can be left at home in Australia varies from state to state. Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania have comparatively harsh penalties for parents who leave children under the age of twelve at home unattended. The other states don’t have any specific laws about kids being left without adult supervision.

Getting the balance right

Parents have a duty of care to keep children safe and not expose them to risk. This aspect of parenting needs should be balanced with the development of independence and responsibility in children.

Leaving kids on their own for short periods is good training for independence and problem-solving. A five minute trip to visit to a neighbour; a twenty minute walk around the block; or a quick trip to the supermarket are great opportunities to leave children unattended for short periods. Gradual exposure to being on their own prepares kids cognitively and emotionally to be left at home for long periods.

Guidelines

When leaving a child at home unsupervised consider the following factors:

Safety: Keeping kids safe is the number one priority so ensure kids are busy, comfortable and prepared for an emergency. This includes leaving appropriate phone numbers of people and services to call, and ensuring that there are neighbours available if needed at short notice.

Cognitive readiness: Consider if kids are capable of managing problems or unforeseen circumstances such a stranger knocking on the door or a child slipping and falling. Some children are more able than others to think their way through problems and they aren’t easily flustered by unknown circumstances. Prepare children for emergencies by discussing different scenarios such as what they should do in a power failure or what to do if they locked themselves out.

Emotional readiness: Take into account whether kids can cope emotionally with being alone. Some children find it difficult being alone for a long period of time, quickly becoming bored and in some cases, distressed. Gradual, step-by-step exposure to time alone can prepare kids for separation from adults and time on their own.

Responsibility: Kids may be mature enough to cope with being on their own but that doesn’t mean they should be responsible for the care of others. Any siblings left at home without adult supervision should be able to care for themselves and not rely on an older brother or sister to keep them safe.

Expectations: Leaving children at home on their own involves an element of trust. You need to feel comfortable that children will behave well and can keep themselves safe. Lay out your expectations about their behaviour, their activities, their use of digital devices, the food they can eat and who is able to visit. Be clear with your expectations and let your kids know that you trust them to do the right thing. Trust works both ways so ensure that you are home on time rather than stretching the trust element to suit your needs.

Look for cues

Listen to your kids as they’ll generally let you know when they are ready to start being left at home on their own. When those inevitable requests appear, consider how you can make being home alone happen safely.

There are times when things may go wrong without adult supervision. However, when done with care and foresight this marker of independence can give kids a welcome feeling of confidence and a real sense of accomplishment. The trust you show can also strengthen your relationship with your child.


 

Kylie Wolstencroft
Wellbeing Coordinator / Registered Pycholgist

 

A home for Panda

Today Prep officially thanked George Willows from Year 5, Dougal Johnston from Year 3 and Mr Sam Adams from our Works Department for designing and constructing of the new outdoor cage for Panda the rabbit.

Panda belongs to Lillie Pfeiffer from Prep Biggs and has helped many children feel more comfortable. Now Panda will also be able to enjoy the outdoors when he visits and be able to get to know all of the children in the Junior School.

Please help Panda feel comfortable in his new home and thank George, Dougal and Sam Adams when you see them!

Becca Biggs
Teacher

/ Junior School

Principal’s Message – Term 3 Week 3

Having a goal really helps

Having a goal makes it easier to motivate yourself, especially when your enthusiasm is waning. This is not surprising, given we know that having a purpose is an essential element in leading a rewarding life. At around the mid-teenage stage, brain development is such that young people start to question many aspects of themselves and their surroundings; the desire for greater independence, the heightened need to be accepted in to social groupings, wanting to be individual but to still fit in, concerns over their life beyond school and why am I doing all this, to name a few.

At this time of the year, the College provides essential events for our students who are navigating this potentially difficult time of their lives. The most immediate are Information Nights for the years ahead: for our current Year 8 and 9 students we have the Year 9 & 10 Information Night and for our current Year 10 and 11 students the TCE Information Night. Much of these are about the processes and procedures, as well as opportunities, in the years following so students and parents can see what is available and how to go about accessing it. The other important message that isn’t necessarily spelt out on those nights is that the staff who are responsible for our students have a wealth of knowledge and experience in these areas and are the very best resource for our families.

Another event that is incredibly valuable to all students is the Post-Year 12 Information Evening that was held this week, for Year 10, 11 and 12 students. This evening exposed the students to the array of options available to them once they graduate from Scotch Oakburn. To help students put this in to perspective, I often tell them in our luncheons that ‘career’s advice’ at the school I attended consisted of a noticeboard outside the Year 12 Coordinator’s office with a list of University courses and the Year 12 score required to gain entry.

Our pastoral care in this area starts in Year 9 with an online work aptitude survey to identify what careers students’ interest and skills may naturally lead them to. In Year 10, students are involved in our Work Experience program and in Term 3 all Year 10 students have a meeting with the Director of Curriculum, Ms Helen Dosser, to plan out their pathway through TCE.

Supplementing that, and commencing in Year 11, are one-on-one interviews with our Careers Advisor, Mrs Teresa Darcy, to enable students to make informed decisions about what career, tertiary study option, residential college and/or scholarship they can and will pursue beyond Year 12.

I can’t speak highly enough about the care and consideration that students receive from these people and this process, in addition to that of their House Head, tutor, subject teachers and co-curricular leaders on a daily basis. It is only after students have gone through the full experience in these years that they truly appreciate the enormous support and care they have received at this potentially vulnerable time.

The outcome of this is the identification of a goal or goals by our students, to help provide the appropriate motivation and purpose, as they travel through their senior years. It is therefore not surprising that the learning environment we enjoy is so positive, a view that is often shared with me by students who come to the College from elsewhere.

Andy Müller
Principal

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NEWS

Welcome to College news. News is displayed in date order as received with most recent at the top.  You can SEARCH for a specific article using the search box above.

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Principal’s Message Term 3 Week 4

This week we celebrated Science Week across the College with many different and exciting activities for students of all ages. These heightened our awareness that everything around us involves Science: the note played on an instrument, the cooking of food, the curving path of a soccer ball, life-giving respiration, the operation of an engine, why ice is less dense than liquid water, and so the list goes on, ad infinitum. Many of the scientific principles that we take for granted today were proposed centuries ago by early pioneering scientists.

The earliest people whom society recognised as scientists were called Natural Philosophers of Ancient Greece. They discussed and hypothesised about the world around them. Their discussions were rarely challenged by experimentation and at times their logic led to misconceptions. For example, it was ‘logical’ to think that if an object was heavier, it fell to the ground faster. This could have been easily debunked by experimentation but for some reason, it was not challenged for centuries. Some theories though were well ahead of their time and often it was only the lack of scientific equipment that held the theory back from general acceptance.

Democritus (460 – 370 BC), proposed that all matter was composed of atoms that are physically indivisible. However, Aristotle and Plato rejected the theories of Democritus, instead accepting the theory of Empedocles who said that all matter was composed of four elements: fire, air, water, and earth.

Another Greek, Aristarchus of Samos (c. 310 – c. 230 BCE) hypothesised that the Sun, not the Earth, was the fixed centre of the universe, and all the planets revolved around it. Eighteen centuries later Copernicus, independently, proposed the same idea, risking ridicule at a time when most people believed that the Earth was the centre of the Universe.

Eratosthenese of Cyrene (276 – 195 BC) was the first person to calculate the circumference of the earth (to within 10% of the currently accepted value), the tilt of the earth’s axis and the distance from the earth to the sun. Later, in the 10th century AD, Abū Rayḥān Al-Bīrūnī, a pioneering Muslim scientist calculated the circumference to within 4% of the true value.

Through the Dark Ages in Europe, much of scientific learning was kept alive through the schools and universities of the Middle East. Universities and rulers had immense libraries and the thirst for knowledge was astounding. One regional ruler is reported to have offered the mass of gold, equal to the weight of the person who could bring him a text that was not currently in his library.

As an aside, Michelangelo connected science and art – maybe he started the STEAM concept? He lived during the renaissance and risked imprisonment, and possibly death, by performing human autopsies, which were illegal at the time, to improve his knowledge of the human anatomy and so be able to create more life-like artworks. Today we are still in awe of his many works, such as ‘The David’ and the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Similarly, Galileo risked being excommunicated when he supported Copernicus’ theory of the solar system.

Gradually, science has become defined more by experimentation and numerical formulas than philosophical musings to explain the behaviour of our world. Today the fields of Science are many and they all demand experimentation to produce data and evidence to confirm observations and hypotheses that ultimately lead to the acceptance of theories.

Andy Müller
Principal

Senior School Play – Away

Scotch Oakburn College presents Away

We invite you to come along to this year’s Senior School play, Away by Michael Gow.

A magical play every Australian can relate to … set in the summer of 1967-68. It has been named one of Australia’s Classic plays, depicting life in Australia post World War 2 and in the midst of The Vietnam War.

It’s a tragically beautiful play with resonance on so many levels. Includes styles of realism, comedy, fantasy, Shakespearean and a play-within-a play.

Fun, crazy and comedic but behind the veneer of holiday fanfare, Gold Coast glitz, and high school theatrics are three families that are scared, angered, and fracturing.

Please note: the topics and themes in this performance make it unsuitable for young children. We recommend Middle and Senior School students and above.

Performances: Wednesday 4 September, Thursday 5 September and Friday 6 September

Time: 7.00pm
Location: Horton Auditorium, Performing Arts Centre
Cost: Adults $20 Students/Concession $15

Book seats now

 

/ Middle School, Senior School

Destination Moon: more missions, more science

The 2019 National Science Week theme engrossed students from Early Learning to Year 5 in classrooms and in conneXions this week. Learning in and through science was at the forefront for a significant part of the week’s learning program as integration of the three strands of the Australian Curriculum for Science – Science Understanding, Science Inquiry Skills and Science as a Human Endeavour – underpinned a range of exciting learning experiences in conneXions.

Missions to the moon in our very own lunar module (a scaled half-size model of the Apollo11 command module Columbia that took Neil Armstrong and two fellow astronauts to the moon and back 50 years ago), virtual reality moonwalks and space experiences through VR Goggles, creating interactive 3D augmented reality space pictures, walking on the moon or reading about the moon or other space facts while sitting on a simulation of the moon’s surface, constructing rockets and sculptures in the Maker Space, listening to astronauts in the International Space Station reading children’s books Rosie Revere Engineer or Ada Twist Scientist, exploring the Mars terrain using spheros, coding beebots and bluebots to go on deep space adventures, and learning more about the moon from displays of researched class work by Year 5 and Year 1 students, captured the interest of Junior School students throughout the week.

Thank you to the conneXions staff team led by Miranda Creak and Marissa Saville,  Brian Howie and the College Works staff, and other staff and students who contributed to such an exciting and productive week’s learning.

Science Week also featured a range of classroom and Claremont garden-based investigations and experiments for all ages, visits to Helix at the Penquite Campus for some classes, and science activities in the Outside School Hours Care Centre.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Book Week

From science to reading  – or just how much do these subjects overlap?

Next week, 17-23 August is celebrated as Children’s Book Week in Australian schools. This brings our priority focus next week to ‘Reading: My Secret Power’, this year’s Book Week theme. All Junior School students, from 3-year-olds to Year 5, will experience a range of engaging reading experiences, including workshops with published children’s authors.

Book Week is also another opportunity for families at home to enjoy reading and sharing books together. We know just how valuable for children’s learning – especially young children – being read to regularly is. Parents are most welcome to visit conneXions to learn more about Book Week and to share a book with their child(ren) – next week or at any time.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Junior School Chess

On Tuesday 12 August, our Junior chess team competed in the final ChessKid tournament for 2019. 17 of our Junior School students represented Scotch Oakburn beautifully and came away with first place in Division B and second place in Division A. For our Year 5 representatives, well done on your last competition with the Junior School. Thank you for your leadership and willingness to coach our younger players.

In Division B, Grady Frith placed second overall by winning 5 ½ out of 7 games. Alongside this amazing effort were James Van Der Aa and Gomanth Anand Lokesh who placed equal third with a score of 5 out of 7. Gomanth also received an award for the most improved player in this division. Well done to the B team who placed first overall!

In Division A, Amelie Geddes received an award for top girl and James Walker was awarded most improved player. Our A team placed second overall which automatically qualifies 5 players to the state final. Players chosen to represent Scotch Oakburn are yet to be finalised. Full results can be found here.

There were many proud moments, highlights and learning opportunities shared. The State final will be held 21 October.

Junior School Chess will continue to run each Tuesday at lunchtime in conneXions for all interested students!

Rebecca Ballard
Teacher

 

/ Junior School

Mid Winter Party

Thanks to everyone in the College community who joined us last Friday night for our annual Mid-Winter Party. It was a great night and wonderful to see so many new faces there.

Special thanks to our current parents – Ben Newman, Chris Veevers, Selena Palmer & Cathryn Cocker for their support in making the venue look so amazing. To Rob Youl (current parent) and Sam Woolley (’99) for their tunes and to Fred Lester (’01), Charles Headlam (’14), Lachie Stewart (Year 11) and Joyce Williamson (past staff and past parent) for their fantastic “Ode to a Haggis”.  If you haven’t seen the video on Facebook it is definitely worth a look – https://www.facebook.com/ScotchOakburnCollege/videos/366742474249373/

Nicole Willcox
Community and Events Manager

Senior School Round Square

Are animals ours to use? More specifically, is it acceptable to use them to do tests on? These are some of the questions posed by Year 11 student Scarlett Veevers during this week’s Senior Round Square meeting.

Humans have used animals for thousands of years, be it horses for travel and farming, dogs for companionship and hunting, and domesticated animals for food and clothing. However, in recent history, humans have used animals for a variety of testing purposes, ranging from the safety of food additives and cosmetics through to the effectiveness of pharmaceuticals and military weapons. Some animals are genetically altered so they are guaranteed to get certain cancers or other diseases so that preventative drugs can be tested on them. Is this ethical? Do the benefits outweigh the costs?

There were plenty of opinions and different perspectives but no easy answers to a subject that continues to cause spirited debate in wider society.

On another note, our Senior Round Square students will be taking care of the food scrap composting from the Robert Dean Senior Student Centre and using it to feed several worm farms and to create compost for the veggie gardens behind the Helix. All students can assist in this process by ensuring that only food scraps go in the compost bin and that plastics and other rubbish either get recycled or go into a general waste bin.

Mark Hassell
Dean of Students

/ Round Square, Senior School

Fathers’ Day Breakfast

Fathers' Day breakfast

ONLY 1 WEEK LEFT TO BOOK!

This event always sells out – please book now to ensure you are not disappointed.

Please join the Year Level Parent Representatives and the wider College community for a relaxed casual Fathers’ Day Breakfast @ Laneway, Elphin Campus.

Enjoy barista-made coffee, breakfast goodies from the grazing table and gourmet breakfast buns.

As always, the aim of the occasion is to create a happy time for children to share with the adult males in their lives, be it dad, big brother, uncle, grandad, stepfather or a friend.

Date: Friday 30 August
Time: 7.30am – 8.30am
Venue: Laneway, Junior School, Elphin Campus. (There will be heating! If it rains we’ll be in the Mary Fox Performing Arts Centre, Elphin Campus)

BOOK NOW

Archives exhibition

We invite our community to attend the opening of our next s.p.a.c.e. gallery exhibition, curated by our College Archivist, Veronica Macno.

Traditions Combined: the amalgamation of Oakburn College and Scotch College is an exhibition that celebrates the 40th anniversary of the amalgamation of Oakburn College and Scotch College. The establishment of Scotch Oakburn College in 1979 can be traced back to Horton College, the Methodist Ladies’ College, later known as Oakburn College, and to Scotch College.

Opening words will be provided by Senator Wendy Askew (’80), Liberal Senator for Tasmania, who was present as a student during the amalgamation.

The exhibition will include a selection of material from the Scotch Oakburn College Archive Collection.

Opening: Friday 23 August 5.30pm
Location: s.p.a.c.e. Gallery, Performing Arts Centre, Penquite Campus
RSVP to attend the opening by following this link.

The exhibition continues until Thursday 19 September.  We encourage our community to drop in any time between 9.00am and 5.00pm Monday to Friday during this time.

 

Move Well, East Well

Scotch Oakburn Junior School has once again been accredited as a Move Well – Eat Well School, having met the Statewide program’s criteria around the promotion of healthy drinking and eating in lunchboxes and through the tuckshop, alongside a strong Health and Physical Education program and associated activities for active play.

Coordinated by the State Department for Health and Human Services, ‘Move Well Eat Well promotes a healthier Tasmania in which children can enjoy healthy eating and physical activity every day. It contributes to a healthy lifestyle and to the prevention of a range of chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, some cancers and dental decay.’ Move Well Eat Well is celebrating its 10th year in primary schools.

Thank you to Mrs Catriona Hurd for her coordination of our Move Well Eat Well program, Cathy Maartensz in the Junior School Tuckshop, and to all staff, students and families for raising awareness and supporting this initiative.

Lachie Wright
Head of Junior School

/ Junior School

Christina Booth workshops

BookWeek started early for some of our Junior School students on Thursday when Christina Booth, a semi-regular artist in residence, visited our College. Year 3 and 4 students followed on from classroom learning and delved deeper into Christina’s newest picture book, One Careless Night.  Christina created this beautiful, but heartbreaking picture book to tell the story of Australia’s last thylacine (Tasmanian tiger), which died in captivity in Hobart Zoo. By sharing this story of extinction with the world, Christina hopes readers will think about how humans can learn from the past to inform the future – extinction is forever. We finished with a drawing workshop and students created these wonderful Thylacine sketches with Christina’s guidance.

Christina also presented to Year 1 and 2 students but this time, Christina linked with the current Year 2 Narrative writing focus with a writing workshop. Using Mary Fox Hall in a totally new way, students built upon classroom writing in a shared workshop. By using picture stimulus images and ‘waking up the right side of our brains’ we brainstormed and asked ourselves questions (Who? What? Where? When? and most importantly, Why?) to develop some story ideas. Christina talked about how a story is like a seed; it needs to grow and change, discarding its outer layers and developing over time. Students were excited to take their writing back to their learning environments and revisit their brainstorming, asking more questions to construct further story ideas.

For more information please visit the dash here https://thedash.soc.tas.edu.au/homepage/12751.

Kylie Brewster
21st Century Technologies

/ Junior School

Student Achievement

Congratulations to Lachie Frame (Year 8) who was awarded the Tasmanian Junior Lifesaver of the Year Award in an awards ceremony in Hobart at weekend.

This is selected from all Junior (14 and under) participants in the sport in Tasmania and covers all-round participation in competitions, patrols, club and community involvement, and knowledge of beach safety matters.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

Battle of the Houses – Singing Competition

Next Friday 23 August, the annual Middle and Senior School House Singing Competition will be held at 2.00pm in the Penquite HPEC.

Each House has been working very hard for the past month under the leadership of their House Captains on refining their chosen song and War Cry.   There will be limited seating for spectators, however, there will be plenty of standing room on the HPEC balcony. Parents are most welcome to attend. We also look forward to welcoming our Year 5 students to the Middle School to view the performances.

Kate Croft
Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School

 

/ Middle School, Senior School

Information Evening for 2020 Year 9 and 10 students and parents

On Wednesday, 21 August we are holding an important Information Evening, in the Horton Auditorium, for 2020 Year 9 and 10 students and parents, commencing at 7.00pm.

The purpose of the evening is to help students and parents manage their transition to the Scotch Oakburn Senior School.  In Years 9 and 10, students have a wide choice of subjects in our Electives Program.  The way this program operates and the opportunities for breadth of choice will be explained.  Heads of Departments of elective subjects will be present for informal discussions with individual parents and students after the presentation. The 2020 course handbook will be available on the evening.

Kate Croft
Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School

/ Middle School, Senior School

Year 7 Parent/Student/Teacher conferences

Year 7 Parent Student Teacher conferences will take place on Monday, 19 August.  Parents will soon receive communication regarding the online booking process.  Parents are asked to book 10-minute sessions with teachers.  The evening runs from 4.00pm – 8.00pm in the Middle School.  It is important that all parents and students attend these conferences.  If you feel that you require more than the scheduled 10 minutes to meet with a teacher, please contact the teacher you need to speak with directly and organise an alternative time to meet.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

Physical Pursuits hit the snow

On Wednesday 14 August our Year 10 Physical Pursuits class set off for an afternoon adventure to Ben Lomond Snow Sports.

Students were given the opportunity to ski or board, and if confident use the tows after a short lesson. All students gave it a red hot go and took to the snow with ease, learning the movements very quickly. In almost tropical conditions on the mountain, we spent a solid 3 hours out on the slopes, finishing up with a snow fight and some tobogganing. I would like to thank Mr Paul McKendrick for coming along as another body and for instructing the snowboarders. Thanks also to Mrs Debbie Eastley, Mr Shaun O’Loughlin, Mr Ben Green and Mts Kate Croft for helping to make the afternoon happen. Well done to the students on a great afternoon on Ben Lomond!

Ali Foot
Teacher

/ Senior School

Cows Create Careers

Each year the Year 8 students in the College are involved in a nationwide competition raising awareness of the importance of the Dairy industry. Today sees the arrival of the 2 calves, kindly provided by the Lawrence family, that we will be caring for over the next few months.

All Year 8 students will look at the biology of living things and the systems that work together for healthy life. This integrated unit of study will link a number of subject areas making links between the Dairy industry in Tasmania and classroom learning.

Fiona Taylor
Teacher

/ Middle School

Work Exposure in Government program

The 2019 Work Exposure in Government program (WEX) is taking place from Sunday 20 October to Friday 25 October.

Applications are open to high performing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in Years 10, 11 and 12 to learn about careers in the Australian Government. Students will be accompanied by teachers and mentors who provide cultural mentoring and leadership guidance.

All accommodation, transportation and meals will be provided.

Activities at WEX 2019 may include:

  • meeting government Ministers and parliamentarians
  • visits to the Australian Defence Force Academy and the Australian Federal Police headquarters
  • visits to national institutions such as the Australian War Memorial and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
  • a tour of Parliament House
  • a Careers Expo, where students can talk to representatives from a range of government agencies.

Through WEX, participants will learn about:

  • jobs and career opportunities in the Australian Government
  • applying for government jobs
  • how laws are made and enforced
  • support available to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees

Forms and eligibility criteria for student and teacher applications can be found here.

Applications must be submitted by emailing a scanned copy of the completed form to wex@pmc.gov.au by Friday 23 August 2019.

 

/ Senior School

Student Achievements

The State Short Course Championships were held in Hobart last weekend.  Quite a number of Scotch Oakburn students participated, many representing the Launceston Aquatic Club. Individual medals for College swimmers at that club were:

Dawson Howell (Year 12) – 2 Gold, 2 Silver
Jasmine Irani – 2 Gold, 3 Silver, 2 Bronze
Emily Mitchell (Year 8) – 6 Gold
Grace Mitchell (Year 6) – 1 Silver
Amy Muldoon (Year 9) – 1 Gold, 1 Bronze
Bella Muldoon (Year 6)  – 4 Gold, 1 Silver
Edward Watson (Year 11) – 2 Bronze

Emily Mithcell also sent new State records in the Girls 13 years 50 Backstroke and 100 Backstroke events.

If you have any other swimming results you would like to share please forward to your Head of School who will be happy to share.

Kate Croft
Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School

/ Middle School, Senior School

2019 Hanyuqiao (Tasmanian Chinese Speaking Competition)

Next Wednesday, 21 August, Year 7 and Year 8 students will compete via video conference in the 2019 Tasmanian Chinese Speaking Competition.  We wish Ryan Puccetti, Jade Cleary, Amelia Corrigan, Lachie Frame and Sasha Yuvchenko all the best in this competition.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School

/ Middle School

Science Titration competition

Students in senior school Science took part in Science Week activities by participating in the state challenge of the 2019 RACI Titration Competition. Scotch Oakburn College entered 15 teams of 3 students in the competition. Students from TCE Physical Science and Chemistry were involved and during this time 50 samples were analysed. State-wide there were over 150 teams from 20 schools and colleges across Tasmania participating in the annual competition.

Fiona Taylor
Science

/ Senior School

Japan Trip 2020

A reminder that deposits for the Japan Trip 2020 can now be paid at either Middle School or Senior School reception.  Deposits are required to secure your place on the trip and must be paid by 13 September.

Jenny Banbury
Coordinator of Japanese

/ Middle School, Senior School

Badminton win

Scotch Oakburn has won the NSATIS Badminton final. It has been many years since we have had an NSATIS win in this sport. In a very close encounter with Launceston Christian School our team won 9 games to 7. It was a fitting reward to our Year 12 captains Alice Cui and Casper Murrell who narrowly lost the final last year.

Played in a great sportsman like manner, players from both schools gave their best in an enthralling contest. Congratulations to the team on their season and for the way they have conducted themselves throughout the competition.

Rob Jeffery
Sport Administrator

/ Senior School

Sheep Poo – get your garden set for Spring!

The Scotch Oakburn College Rowing Club are once again selling their very popular sheep poo as a fundraiser:

Pick up and Pre-Order Delivery options available

Visit our rowing shed in Boland Street on Saturday’s commencing 10 August 2019 between 8.00am-12.00pm.

$5.00 per bag.

Pre-order by contacting Jamie Breden on 0438 038 773 or email Jamie.Breden@soc.tas.edu.au.

** FREE delivery 10 bags or more and Seniors FREE delivery with no minimum. **

Schools Cross Country

Over a six week period in Term 2, over 75 students from Early Learning to Year 12 participated in the Schools Cross Country series run by Newstead Athletics. Each Saturday we would meet at various locations to run, play and have fun with others. A very encouraging, community-oriented and fun environment for all who are wanting to get outside and keep active!

This year Scotch Oakburn College won the Junior division (Early Learning to Year 6) with 855 points and came second in the Senior division (Year 7-12) with 467 points. These combined achievements are a great reflection on all who took part, both for their athletic abilities as well as their encouragement and support to one another. All 75+ participants should be congratulated! We would also like to highlight some exciting individual results.

Under 7 Boys – William Rigney 4th
Under 9 Boys – Hamish Quill 1st
Under 9 Girls – Sarah Horsman 3rd, Chloe Hassell 4th
Under 11 boys – Ben Giasli 4th
Under 11 Girls – Chloe Horsman 4th, Isla Irani 5th
Under 13 boys – Henry Jones 2nd
Under 13 Girls – Bella Show 3rd
Under 15 Boys – Bryce Lawes 2nd, Hamish Fyffe 3rd
Under 15 Girls – Rebecca Clarke 2nd
Under 20 boys – Jonathan Clarke

A special thank you to Newstead Athletics for running such a great series for students to be part of!

We’d also like to thank all the families who have supported the School Series Cross Country! Your support is much appreciated!

Well done to all involved, keep up the running and we hope to see you all and more next year!

Becca Biggs
Teacher

Year 6 Canberra

A reminder to all year 6 students to return your confirmation of Student Details for your trip to Canberra to Middle School reception as soon as possible. It is important all details are up to date in the event of an emergency.

Julie Kemp
Head of Middle School  

/ Middle School

Chess

Scotch Oakburn had another fantastic day at the third Chess Tournament of the year, hosted at Launceston Grammar, Monday 12 August.

Our Primary teams had another very good day, with the Primary B team winning the Primary B title and the Primary A finishing 2nd. The future looks bright for chess at Scotch Oakburn.

Our Secondary team finished second behind a very strong Launceston College (LC) team. We have battled with LC the whole year and had won the first two tournaments. The State finals in October should also be very interesting.

Our Captain, Siddhant Kohli (Year 11) had a great tournament despite a surprise loss against a young and talented player who plays for a club. He finished equal 1st with 6 wins out of 7, notably beating the highest-ranked player of the competition.  Addison Djatschenko (Year 9) and James Banbury(Year 12) continued their good record this year with 5 wins and Mitchell Fulton (Year 8) scored 4 1/2.

Our players showed great determination, enthusiasm and grace. It is good to see growth in skills and confidence in our young players.

The State final will be played on Monday 21 October.

Fabrice Dauchez
Person-in-Charge of Chess

/ Middle School, Senior School

Community News

We are pleased to provide a community news section in our news highlighting events in the wider Launceston community that may be of interest to families. Included this week:

  • UTAS Psychology Research – 10-17 year olds needed for problem-solving research
  • Volunteers needed – Open House Launceston. See some amazing homes and give back to the community
Go to Community News

 

Leaving your kids home alone

Author:  Michael Grose


 

Schools holidays and after school times present challenges for families when parents work. Finding suitable care for children is tricky, particularly when usual arrangements fall over or kids tell you they are too old to be looked after.

A recent study showed that one in 10 Australian children under the age of twelve spend some part of a school holiday at home without supervision.

The legal age when a child can be left at home in Australia varies from state to state. Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania have comparatively harsh penalties for parents who leave children under the age of twelve at home unattended. The other states don’t have any specific laws about kids being left without adult supervision.

Getting the balance right

Parents have a duty of care to keep children safe and not expose them to risk. This aspect of parenting needs should be balanced with the development of independence and responsibility in children.

Leaving kids on their own for short periods is good training for independence and problem-solving. A five minute trip to visit to a neighbour; a twenty minute walk around the block; or a quick trip to the supermarket are great opportunities to leave children unattended for short periods. Gradual exposure to being on their own prepares kids cognitively and emotionally to be left at home for long periods.

Guidelines

When leaving a child at home unsupervised consider the following factors:

Safety: Keeping kids safe is the number one priority so ensure kids are busy, comfortable and prepared for an emergency. This includes leaving appropriate phone numbers of people and services to call, and ensuring that there are neighbours available if needed at short notice.

Cognitive readiness: Consider if kids are capable of managing problems or unforeseen circumstances such a stranger knocking on the door or a child slipping and falling. Some children are more able than others to think their way through problems and they aren’t easily flustered by unknown circumstances. Prepare children for emergencies by discussing different scenarios such as what they should do in a power failure or what to do if they locked themselves out.

Emotional readiness: Take into account whether kids can cope emotionally with being alone. Some children find it difficult being alone for a long period of time, quickly becoming bored and in some cases, distressed. Gradual, step-by-step exposure to time alone can prepare kids for separation from adults and time on their own.

Responsibility: Kids may be mature enough to cope with being on their own but that doesn’t mean they should be responsible for the care of others. Any siblings left at home without adult supervision should be able to care for themselves and not rely on an older brother or sister to keep them safe.

Expectations: Leaving children at home on their own involves an element of trust. You need to feel comfortable that children will behave well and can keep themselves safe. Lay out your expectations about their behaviour, their activities, their use of digital devices, the food they can eat and who is able to visit. Be clear with your expectations and let your kids know that you trust them to do the right thing. Trust works both ways so ensure that you are home on time rather than stretching the trust element to suit your needs.

Look for cues

Listen to your kids as they’ll generally let you know when they are ready to start being left at home on their own. When those inevitable requests appear, consider how you can make being home alone happen safely.

There are times when things may go wrong without adult supervision. However, when done with care and foresight this marker of independence can give kids a welcome feeling of confidence and a real sense of accomplishment. The trust you show can also strengthen your relationship with your child.


 

Kylie Wolstencroft
Wellbeing Coordinator / Registered Pycholgist

 

A home for Panda

Today Prep officially thanked George Willows from Year 5, Dougal Johnston from Year 3 and Mr Sam Adams from our Works Department for designing and constructing of the new outdoor cage for Panda the rabbit.

Panda belongs to Lillie Pfeiffer from Prep Biggs and has helped many children feel more comfortable. Now Panda will also be able to enjoy the outdoors when he visits and be able to get to know all of the children in the Junior School.

Please help Panda feel comfortable in his new home and thank George, Dougal and Sam Adams when you see them!

Becca Biggs
Teacher

/ Junior School
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